Devin N. Morris at PULSE Miami Beach Featured in OkayAfrica

Devin N. Morris at PULSE Miami Beach Featured in OkayAfrica

4 Black Artists You Need To See at PULSE Miami Beach 2017

PULSE Miami Beach returns for its 13th edition this weekend, and these are the black artists you can't miss.

 

Gordon Parks: Legacy Highlighted by SF/ARTS Curator Christian L. Frock

Gordon Parks: Legacy Highlighted by SF/ARTS Curator Christian L. Frock

This exhibition features works by the legendary American photographer Gordon Parks, alongside works of artists who have drawn great inspiration from his iconic work, including a new video released by recording artist Kendrick Lamar, portraiture by visual activist Zanele Muholi, and a collaborative project with Ralph Ellison—a series of films are screened continuously in the gallery.

Leonardo Benzant Awarded the 2017 Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant

Leonardo Benzant Awarded the 2017 Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant

Joan Mitchell Foundation Announces 2017 Painters & Sculptors Grant Recipients

November 14, 2017

The Joan Mitchell Foundation has announced its 2017 Painters & Sculptors grant recipients, a group of 25 artists who will each receive $25,000 in unrestricted funds. Established by the foundation’s namesake in 1993, the grants are awarded annually to under-recognized artists working in the United States through a nomination and subsequent jury vote.

Lavar Munroe Featured in Juxtapoz Magazine

Lavar Munroe Featured in Juxtapoz Magazine

Lavar Munroe's Grotesque Gestures

November 14, 2017

Lavar Munroe (b. Nassau, Bahamas 1982) is an interdisciplinary artist whose work encompasses painting, drawing, sculpture, installation art, and a hybrid medium that straddle the line between sculpture and painting. His gorgeously warped paintings express elements of grotesquerie and beauty in a never-ending exploration of form versus abstraction.

Zanele Muholi Featured in Vogue

Zanele Muholi Featured in Vogue

With Zanele Muholi, the South African LGBTQ Community Is (Literally) Taking Center Stage

November 10, 2017

Right before South African photographer and visual activist Zanele Muholi took the stage at New York’s Schomburg Center for a discussion with artist Renee Cox, a group of 20 or so South African dancers, singers, and artists circled around the New York Public Library’s Langston Hughes Lobby and performed a version of the South African national anthem “Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika.” Sung in Zulu and Shona, but without the English and Afrikaans that are part of the current official version, the song is part of a push to rid the country of colonial legacies and continue the discussions of post-apartheid racial inequalities, both of which have been heated by the recent student protests that have roiled its cities. Hence, it seemed only appropriate that the group was standing on the cosmogram at the center of the space, under which Langston Hughes’s ashes were buried.

Zanele Muholi Featured in The Village Voice

Zanele Muholi Featured in The Village Voice

Zanele Muholi Brings Her ‘Visual Activism’ Out of Africa, and Into New York

November 7, 2017

Zanele Muholi travels with a crew: a multitalented posse of artists, project managers, make-up mavens, even a doctor—specifically, a gynecologist. The personnel is variable — in 2012, for a project in Paris, she brought a whole soccer team to the famous Parc des Princes stadium — with the constant that all are South African, Black, and queer, lesbian, or trans folk. Last week, Muholi and her team descended on New York, registering their presence by breaking into group harmonies, dance steps, and South African liberation chants from JFK Airport to the Hoyt-Schermerhorn subway station. “I don’t like to shine alone,” Muholi says. “It’s always nicer to have a number of diamonds.”

Zanele Muholi Featured in the New Yorker

Zanele Muholi Featured in the New Yorker

The Fever-Dream Urgency of Zanele Muholi’s Self-Portraits in “Somnyama Ngonyama”

October 20, 2017

Looking at the astonishing pictures in Zanele Muholi’s recent series, “Somnyama Ngonyama” (which means “Hail the Dark Lioness” in Zulu), it’s tempting to start mentally sketching an art-family tree. One branch might include other women who’ve excelled at photographic self-portraiture, from the trans French Surrealist Claude Cahun to Cindy Sherman and Carrie Mae Weems. Another might reach back to the mid-twentieth-century photo studios of Seydou Keïta and Malick Sidibé, in Bamako, Mali, which were meccas of pattern on pattern and personal style. But such affinities, while undoubtedly relevant, occlude the real power of Muholi’s project, which is a radical act of protest and reclamation, a deeply personal response by a woman born in 1972, in Umlazi, South Africa, to the colonizing and exoticizing of the black female body by all those cameras that arrived before hers.

Zanele Muholi Interviewed by OkayAfrica

Zanele Muholi Interviewed by OkayAfrica

Zanele Muholi on Queering the Zeitz MOCCAA

October 11, 2017

One of South Africa's best known artists talks about how she's conquering the international art world on her terms.

Zanele Muholi Featured in The Guardian

Zanele Muholi Featured in The Guardian

‘I'm scared. But this work needs to be shown’: Zanele Muholi's 365 protest photographs

July 14, 2017

Her house has been broken into, her images stolen. But the South African will not stop using photography to highlight massacres, homophobia, hate crimes and rape. She talks about her new series: taking a self-portrait every day for a year.

Zanele Muholi at PERFORMA17 Featured in Art Africa Magazine

Zanele Muholi at PERFORMA17 Featured in Art Africa Magazine

Zanele Muholi to Take Over PERFORMA17

September 27, 2017

Muholi to showcase at PERFORMA, the internationally acclaimed organization dedicated to live performance across disciplines. AFROGLOSSIA and a South African Pavilion Without Walls both will feature in Performa 17, the seventh edition of the Performa Biennial, to take place November 1–19, 2017, at locations throughout New York City.

Jenkins Johnson Projects Featured in Cultured Magazine

Jenkins Johnson Projects Featured in Cultured Magazine

Pleasure Principle: Derrick Adams uses his canvases – and plenty of them – to create art that expresses serenity over struggle

Derrick Adams might be the hardest working artist in America. His art is on exhibition with such regularity, it came as no surprise that in a recent episode of the hit HBO comedy-drama Insecure, Issa Rae and her twentysomething girlfriends considered the facts of dating before Adams’s Pilot #1. When Adams isn’t opening his own shows this fall, he will be curating them. For the opening of the New York-based Jenkins Johnson Project Space, he has curated a series of exhibitions, “Arjan Zazueta: Beautification” and the group show, “Hidden in Plain Sight,” opening September 30.

Inaugural Exhibitions at Jenkins Johnson Projects Featured on Observer

Inaugural Exhibitions at Jenkins Johnson Projects Featured on Observer

Jenkins Johnson Gallery Opens NYC Space With Dual Shows Curated by Derrick Adams

This past weekend, San Francisco-based gallery Jenkins Johnson—known for showcasing work by contemporary artists pushing boundaries of gender and race—launched a project space in Brooklyn’s small but historic Prospect Lefferts Gardens neighborhood. Located just south of the Brooklyn Museum, it’s one of the first spaces of its kind in this small but historic neighborhood. To christen the new space, owner Karen Jenkins-Johnson brought in Brooklyn-based artist Derrick Adams to guest curate not one but two inaugural shows.

 

Deborah Roberts at EXPO Chicago Highlighted by The Art Newspaper

Deborah Roberts at EXPO Chicago Highlighted by The Art Newspaper

Expo Chicago opens a week of cross-collaboration in the city

With the architecture biennial opening on the heels of Expo Chicago, and the Terra Foundation’s Art Design Chicago gearing up for 2018 with a presence at the fair, intersectional collaboration seems to be the prevailing spirit of the moment.

 

Gordon Parks Featured in New York Times

Gordon Parks Featured in New York Times

The Cinematic Images of Gordon Parks

A new exhibition, “Gordon Parks — I Am You. Selected Works, 1942-1978,” currently on view at Foam in Amsterdam through Sept. 6, explores how Mr. Parks not only made television and Hollywood films, but also employed cinematic techniques when taking and sequencing photographs.

Deborah Roberts Featured in Art News

Deborah Roberts Featured in Art News

Here’s the List of 19 Emerging Artists to Feature in New Studio Museum Show

The Studio Museum in Harlem announced the list of 19 artists to show this fall in “Fictions,” the fifth of the institution’s so-called “F-series” exhibitions of emerging artists. (Past F-series shows, dating back to 2001, have included “Freestyle,” “Frequency,” “Fore,” and “Flow.”)

Sadie Barnette Named Finalist for Artadia’s 2017 San Francisco Awards

Sadie Barnette Named Finalist for Artadia’s 2017 San Francisco Awards

Bay Area artists Simone Bailey, Sadie Barnette, Sofía Córdova, Carrie Hott, and Davina Semo have been named finalists for Artadia’s 2017 San Francisco Awards. After another round of judging, two of them will receive $10,000 from the organization.

Nnenna Okore Interviewed by RenderForest

Nnenna Okore Interviewed by RenderForest

Nnenna Okore - Talented Hands

Today our guest is artist Nnenna Okore.  Finding reusable value in discarded materials, Okore enriches her work with layers of meaning through familiar and painstaking processes.

Kendrick Lamar’s "ELEMENT" Inspired By Gordon Parks Reviewed by The New Yorker

Kendrick Lamar’s "ELEMENT" Inspired By Gordon Parks Reviewed by The New Yorker

Kendrick Lamar’s Lyrics Get the Images They Deserve in the Video for “ELEMENT.”

As many Web sites, blogs, and Twitter users have pointed out, [Kendrick] Lamar’s video—directed by him, his manager and childhood friend Dave Free, and the German photographer Jonas Lindstroem—draws directly from the work of the photojournalist Gordon Parks. 

Annie Kevans' Second Feature in Vogue USA

Annie Kevans' Second Feature in Vogue USA

Can You Define Beauty? These 11 Artists Did for Vogue’s 125th Anniversary

Is it beautiful? Is it he or she? The decision is up to you. The English artist Annie Kevans contributes a portrait of Hari Nef, the transgender fashion model. “Like art, beauty is subjective, and there is an inherent freedom in that,” Kevans says. “In this unique time in history, when global discrepancies have never been more apparent, transgender models such as Hari Nef and Andreja Pejic remind us how fortunate we are to live in a society that not only accepts diversity but finds it beautiful.”

Gordon Parks in "ELEMENT" Reviewed on Genius

Gordon Parks in "ELEMENT" Reviewed on Genius

How Kendrick Lamar's 'element.' Video Honors Gordon Parks' Iconic Photograph

Kendrick Lamar’s new “ELEMENT.” video is striking, but it’s also much more than that. Beyond its stunning imagery, the video doubles as an homage to the legendary photographer Gordon Parks. In 3 minutes and 33 seconds, co-directors Jonas Lindstroem and the Little Homies (comprised of Kendrick Lamar and Dave Free) referenced some of Parks’ most remarkable work, all while making a statement of their own.

Lalla Essaydi Exhibiting at Jamestown Arts Center Featured in Providence Journal

Lalla Essaydi Exhibiting at Jamestown Arts Center Featured in Providence Journal

In Jamestown, visual artists work with words

Lalla Essaydi’s photograph “Converging Territories #29” pursues a similar idea, to earthier results. A cloaked woman’s back is turned from the camera, her shape and even surroundings swaddled in sumptuous, swirling eddies of Arabic calligraphy.

Lalla Essaydi Exhibiting at NMWA Featured in Washington City Paper

Lalla Essaydi Exhibiting at NMWA Featured in Washington City Paper

Revival at National Museum of Women in the Arts Is a Shock to the System

Two of the most subversive pieces in Revival are from Arab artist Lalla Essaydi’s Bullets Revisited series. The photos are eerily reminiscent of 19th century Orientalist paintings that fetishized Arab women through a Western gaze.

Blouin ArtInfo Highlights Nnenna Okore, Osimili

Blouin ArtInfo Highlights Nnenna Okore, Osimili

Nnenna Okore’s ‘Osimili’ at Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco

“Osimili” an exhibition of works by Nigerian artist Nnenna Okore started on June 1 and will run through July 15, 2017, at Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco.

Jenkins Johnson Gallery Highlighted in Le Quotidien De L'Art

Jenkins Johnson Gallery Highlighted in Le Quotidien De L'Art

Gaining Ground, African American Artists at Art Basel

In the Feature section, Jenkins Johnson (San Francisco) turns the spotlight to photographer Gordon Parks, who chronicled the years of racial segregation and the struggle for Civil Rights. Poignant testimonies of disadvantaged families in Harlem in the 1940s and of ordinary racism in the 1960s. Karen Jenkins-Johnson is the first black gallery owner to join Art Basel. "I am still considered a second-class citizen, and at the fair, people tend to address my white team rather than me,” she sighs, “But we are beginning to reap the rewards of the fight started by our parents. There is still a long way to go, but there is also hope."

Jenkins Johnson Gallery Featured in the New York Times

Jenkins Johnson Gallery Featured in the New York Times

Commerce Meets Culture at Art Basel

Jenkins Johnson Gallery of San Francisco, exhibiting at the Swiss edition of [Art Basel] for the first time, will show a selection of images by the African-American photographer Gordon Parks in the Survey sector.

Apollo Magazine Reviews Gordon Parks Solo Booth at Art Basel

Apollo Magazine Reviews Gordon Parks Solo Booth at Art Basel

The Continued Expansion of Art Basel

In the wake of the controversy surrounding the display of Dana Schutz’s Open Casket (2016) at the Whitney, which came to focus on (among other things) the ethics of transforming documentary photography into art, New York’s Jenkins Johnson Gallery presents Gordon Parks’ photographs, including his celebrated images of the civil rights struggle.

Gordon Parks Exhibiting at FOAM Fotografiemuseum

Gordon Parks Exhibiting at FOAM Fotografiemuseum

Gordon Parks, I AM YOU; Selected Works (1942-1978) at FOAM Fotografiemuseum

With the exhibition Gordon Parks -  I Am You. Selected Works 1942-1978, Foam presents 120 works from the collection of  The Gordon Parks Foundation, including vintage prints, contact sheets, magazines, and film excerpts.

MutualArt Highlights Jenkins Johnson Gallery at Art Basel

MutualArt Highlights Jenkins Johnson Gallery at Art Basel

Who Are the New Galleries at Art Basel 2017?

The “King” of art fairs is fertile ground for fresh perspectives — and ripe with opportunities for smart collectors, explains Natalie Hegert, who spoke to this year’s newest participants.

Gallery owner, Karen Jenkins-Johnson, is one of "12 New Dealers to Watch at Art Basel in Basel"

Gallery owner, Karen Jenkins-Johnson, is one of "12 New Dealers to Watch at Art Basel in Basel"

Feature on Jenkins Johnson Gallery by Artsy

Owner Karen Jenkins-Johnson is using her Art Basel in Basel debut to present three artists whose social critiques on issues such as violence, marginalized communities, and civil rights feel especially topical right now.

Jenkins Johnson Gallery at Art Basel Featured on Artsy

Jenkins Johnson Gallery at Art Basel Featured on Artsy

Jenkins Johnson Gallery's presentation of the Gordon Parks solo booth at Art Basel 2017 was featured on Artsy's homepage.

Lavar Munroe to Exhibit in Prospect.4

Lavar Munroe to Exhibit in Prospect.4

Congratulations to Lavar Munroe, who is a participating artist in Prospect.4: The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp, curated by Trevor Schoonmaker, Chief Curator, the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.

Lavar Munroe to Speak and Exhibit at EXPO Chicago

Lavar Munroe to Speak and Exhibit at EXPO Chicago

Concurrent with Jenkins Johnson Gallery's presentation of his work at EXPO Chicago from September 13 - 17, Lavar Munroe will speak on the panel, Race and Representation in Contemporary Institutions,moderated by Perry Irmer, president and CEO, the DuSable Museum of African American History. Other panelists include Michelle Joan Wilkinson, curator, National Museum of African American History & Culture, and Bomi Odufunade of Dash & Rallo Art Advisory.

Art Ltd. Interviews Nnenna Okore

Art Ltd. Interviews Nnenna Okore

Artist Q & A: Nnenna Okore

Born in Australia, raised in Nigeria and currently based in Chicago, artist Nnenna Okore has exhibited her multimedia works widely around the globe. Through September 10, 2017, the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art’s 70-foot-tall rotunda is filled with Okore’s suspended burlap installation, Sheer Audacity. Okore fuses metaphorical content with labor-intensive processes and tactile material, and over the course of her career, her works have spanned topics from recycling and consumerism to the inescapable cycles of nature and life.

 

“Osimili,” Okore’s upcoming solo exhibition at San Francisco’s Jenkins Johnson Gallery (June 1 – July 15, 2017), also incorporates burlap material in wall-bound works resembling wild, overgrown flora. Okore spoke with art ltd. about this new series, her role as a mentor and chair of the art department at North Park University, and the common threads that wind through the varied works in her oeuvre.

Empire Showcases Work by Lavar Munroe

Empire Showcases Work by Lavar Munroe

Lavar Munroe's painting, Fallen, Godspeed, Glory (Angel No. 2), 2016, appeared on hit Fox TV Show, Empire, in its most recent episode, Toil & Trouble, Pt.1. In the middle of a heist, Munroe's painting is found hanging on the cover of a safe Cookie's sister, Carol, is sent in to crack.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's 'The Evanesced' Reviewed By Hyperallergic

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's 'The Evanesced' Reviewed By Hyperallergic

Imagining the Portraits of African American Women Erased from History

LOS ANGELES — Spanning the length of a large gallery wall at the California African American Museum is a slim rectangular grid of 100 images of women whose names and identities are unknown. Approaching the wall, the individual portraits of black women emerge into focus with their movement and features punctuated by fluid brushstrokes and pops of watercolor. Many of the women are dancing while others are simply posing. Some appear frenetic, while a few exercise calm, quiet rituals of self-care, like braiding hair. Each of the 9-by-12 inch works on white recycled paper is affixed to the wall by two pins. They are not framed. Freed from the narrow confines of boxes, these unidentified women demand that their stories be told.

Black Matters US Features Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle and her Exhibition at CAAM

Black Matters US Features Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle and her Exhibition at CAAM

Black Women Lost And Found

 

We are all worried about Black and Latino girls considered “critically missing” in Washington, D.C.  but for Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle it all has started years ago. Hinkle is using has used her artistic talent to depict the bodies and lives of Black women who have gone missing, and whose stories have been erased.

Dialogues in Drawing Reviewed in the Bay Area Reporter

Dialogues in Drawing Reviewed in the Bay Area Reporter

Gallery-going greets the springtime

Jenkins Johnson Gallery: If the shows mounted here have been inclusive, they've also been especially attuned (and allotted generous space) to works by women artists, who are often constrained or confronted by gender/identity politics, social upheaval, sexism and backlash. 

Kenyatta A.C Hinkle Featured on The Huffington Post

Kenyatta A.C Hinkle Featured on The Huffington Post

Artist Creates Haunting Ode To The Countless Black, Female Bodies That Have Disappeared

Last week, people of color mobilized on social media to spread awareness of the alarming number of black and brown young women currently considered “critically missing” in Washington, D.C. 

 

The viral effort, along with sharing facts regarding the missing teens, encouraged others to question why cases about missing black women often go uncovered by the nightly news and other mainstream media sources. “As a society, we only pay attention when a particular type of woman goes missing,” artist Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle told The Huffington Post. 

Independent Reviews Julia Fullerton-Batten's The Act

Independent Reviews Julia Fullerton-Batten's The Act

Photographer dispels stigma around sex workers with beautiful shots of them in the act

Few industries are as controversial as the sex industry. And few workers are as judged, stigmatised and heaped with the pre-conceived notions of others as sex workers.


It was these ideas that lead London-based photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten to turn her lens to women who use their bodies to earn a living, in an attempt to understand what might lead a person to go into sex work by choice. The resulting photobook, called The Act, features escorts, pornstars, lap and pole-dancers, a stripper, a webcam girl, sex “slaves”, a dominatrix, a burlesque dancer; aerial artistes and a ping pong girl. Each is depicted on a stage to highlight how their work involves an element of performance. 
 

Julia Fullerton-Batten's Series, The Act, Featured in Huck Magazine

Julia Fullerton-Batten's Series, The Act, Featured in Huck Magazine

The photographer turning sex workers into works of art

 

Photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten's latest project, The Act, captures women in the sex industry in theatrical scenes and allows them to tell their own stories.

Curator Christian L. Frock of SF/Arts Reviews Dialogues in Drawing

Curator Christian L. Frock of SF/Arts Reviews Dialogues in Drawing

Curator, Christian L. Frock offers a review of Dialogues in Drawing upon the opening of the exhibition.

LA Times Reviews Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's Exhibition at CAAM

LA Times Reviews Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's Exhibition at CAAM

100 missing women: Drawings at African American museum tell a powerful story of loss

One hundred drawings by Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle of 100 missing African American women simultaneously startle and beguile. Their subject represents the tip of a statistical iceberg of almost unfathomable scope — thousands of black women disappear every year in the United States, whether through criminal activity or for other motives, but their names and faces most often remain obscure.

Dialogues in Drawing Featured on Culture Type

Dialogues in Drawing Featured on Culture Type

Dialogues in Drawing @ Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Mounted in celebration of Women’s History Month, Dialogues in Drawing features 17 artists, and black women are well represented.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle Featured on LA Weekly

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle Featured on LA Weekly

Inspired by #SayHerName, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle Is Keeping Black Women From Disappearing

While contemporary art in its purest definition belongs to the present, it often proves difficult to disentangle the present moment from history. Artist Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle understands this — and she embraces it fully. She’s made it the crux of her work, giving the past and present equal footing and importance in her artistic production.

SF Chronicle Reviews Humanity Today

SF Chronicle Reviews Humanity Today

Social progress through artist's eyes

“Humanity Today,” the Jenkins Johnson Gallery’s latest exhibition, wants people to talk and think and question the world in 2017. The exhibition title itself, open for interpretation, posits the question: What do you, the viewer, believe is the state of humanity today?

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's Exhibition at CAAM Featured on Hyperallergic

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's Exhibition at CAAM Featured on Hyperallergic

Three Powerfully Political Shows Open at the California African American Museum

The California African American Museum kicks off its exhibition cycle this Wednesday with shows about the 1992 LA Uprising and historical disappearance of African-American women.

Humanity Today Featured in Aperture

Humanity Today Featured in Aperture

Visions of Unity: Six Visual Protests

How do artists stand up for what they believe in? With the rise of right-wing politics in the U.S. and Europe, people across all seven continents have felt a renewed urgency to fight for civil liberties. Though the pundits and politicians may have changed since the 1960s, many of the same issues are at stake.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle Featured on Ebony

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle Featured on Ebony

Artist Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle Explores Politics of the Female Body

In her upcoming work, The Evanesced, debuting March 2 at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles, Hinkle calls attention to Black women who go missing as a result of sex trafficking and domestic abuse. Her archival photographs and drawings capture a sense of joy and trauma.

 

Sadie Barnette Featured on e-Flux

Sadie Barnette Featured on e-Flux

Material Matters: Black Radical Aesthetics and the Limits of Visibility

Contemporary black radical aesthetic practices that emphasize materials that surface, texture, and visualize blackness ineluctably trouble, if not unravel, the panoptic qualities of the visual itself. It is without a doubt that images play a hyperactive role in our understanding of black life, but what of the material matters of black resistance?

Humanity Today Named a Must-See by TimeOut San Francisco

Humanity Today Named a Must-See by TimeOut San Francisco

With so many things to do in San Francisco, it's easy to miss the many fantastic art exhibits and shows that pass through smaller galleries, as opposed to big museum shows. While it's nearly impossible for even the most ardent art lover to see it all, TimeOut has once again curated a collection of must see exhibits currently (or soon to be) gracing the walls of San Francisco's finest art spaces.

Carlos Javier Ortiz Wins Studs Terkel Award

Carlos Javier Ortiz Wins Studs Terkel Award

2/10/2017

Carlos Javier Ortiz, a photojournalist and filmmaker who has documented the effects of violence in Chicago for more than a decade, has been named one of four winners of the 2017 Studs Terkel Community Media Award.

Tim Etchells's "Together Apart" at Kunstverein Braunschwein

Tim Etchells's "Together Apart" at Kunstverein Braunschwein

March 4 - May 14, 2017

Tim Etchells Exhibiting at The Museums Sheffield: Millenium Gallery

Tim Etchells Exhibiting at The Museums Sheffield: Millenium Gallery

Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery is hosting a major new collaborative project by internationally renowned artists Tim Etchells and Vlatka Horvat.

 

What Can Be Seen will present a bold, playful reimagining of the city’s historic museum collections alongside new work by the artists, produced especially for the exhibition.

Talk by Sadie & Rodney Barnette at Oakland Museum of California

Talk by Sadie & Rodney Barnette at Oakland Museum of California

February 17, 8:30am-10:00am PST

Join us in celebrating our 3 year anniversary in collaboration with Oakland Museum of California! We’re excited to have Oakland-born artist Sadie Barnette and her father, former Black Panther Rodney Barnette speak on the theme, Moments. Sadie Barnette has used the 500-page FBI surveillance file kept on her father as source material for a series of art works currently on view in OMCA’s All Power To The People: Black Panthers at 50 exhibition.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle at San Diego Mesa College

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle at San Diego Mesa College

Impressions: African American Artists and their Connection to African Art, featuring Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, Robert Pruitt, and Andrea Chung

Impressions: African American artists and their connection to African Art

 

Featuring artwork by Andrea Chung, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle and Robert Pruitt and artifacts from the San Diego Mesa College African Art Collection

 

Co-curated by Alessandra Moctezuma and Denise Rogers, Ph.D.

February 9 – March 1, 2017

 

Reception: Thursday, February 9, 4:30 – 6:30 pm, Art Gallery D101

 

Artists’ Lecture at 6:30 pm following reception.

Aida Muluneh Interviewed by Canadian Art

Aida Muluneh Interviewed by Canadian Art

Aida Muluneh: From Ethiopia to Canada and Back Again

January 19, 2017

Aida Muluneh is a photographer with a world-spanning practice and reputation. In 2016 alone, she had shows in New York and Johannesburg, continued to run the biennial Addis Foto Fest (which she founded in 2010), did a TEDx talk, and extended her photojournalistic and artistic practices. Her artwork is in the collection of the Smithsonian, she has won an award from the European Union, and she has spoken at Art Basel and at New York’s ICI, all while her photojournalism has been published by outlets like the Washington Post.

Lavar Munroe To Exhibit at Afriques Capitales in Paris, France

Lavar Munroe To Exhibit at Afriques Capitales in Paris, France

Afriques Capitales, contemporary African creation arose in La Villette!

The exhibition Africas Capital, dedicated to African cities. Is the occasion to discover during an urban wandering the contemporary African art scene through all the media: paintings, photos, installations, videos, sculptures, sound creations ...

Nnenna Okore Exhibiting at Children's Museum of the Arts

Nnenna Okore Exhibiting at Children's Museum of the Arts

Weather or Not, That is the Questions

Children’s Museum of the Arts is pleased to announce Weather or Not, That is the Question, an exhibition about the power, mystery, and grandeur of weather and its impact on our environment. 

Art Daily Reviews Viewpoints

Art Daily Reviews Viewpoints

Exhibition at Jenkins Johnson Gallery features established masters and exciting emerging artists

Exhibition at Jenkins Johnson Gallery features established masters and exciting emerging artists.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle Featured in Culture Type's The Year in Black Art 2016

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle Featured in Culture Type's The Year in Black Art 2016

A review of the past year in black art makes clear that the challenges are as real as the possibilities.

Aida Muluneh's Surreal Portraits

Aida Muluneh's Surreal Portraits

Ethiopian photographer and contemporary artist Aida Muluneh has lived all over the world before returning to her homeland where she found inspiration for her art.

An Interview with Aida Muluneh

An Interview with Aida Muluneh

Ethiopian photographer seeks new portrayal of Africa

ADDIS ABABA - Surrounded by untidy stacks of paper and abandoned half-empty coffee cups, photographer Aida Muluneh chain smokes cigarettes in her Addis Ababa office and rails against the negative portrayals of Africa by foreigners.

Tim Etchells Presents Ten Purposes at Tate Modern

Tim Etchells Presents Ten Purposes at Tate Modern

Collect a set of instructions that encourage you to experience the galleries in new and different ways

Meet Victor Ehikhamenor, The Man Who Turned KSA’s Guitar To A N52.1m Asset

Meet Victor Ehikhamenor, The Man Who Turned KSA’s Guitar To A N52.1m Asset

In the early hours of Monday morning, history was made on the occasion of KSA’s (King Sunny Ade) 70th birthday and 50th anniversary on stage, which held at the Federal Palace Hotel and Casino. The legendary musician’s vintage Fender Telecaster Guitar was auctioned off at an astounding N52.1 million, thanks to the masterful artistic design by none other than – Victor Ehikhamenor.

Sadie Barnette at Untitled, Miami Beach Featured in Elephant Magazine

Sadie Barnette at Untitled, Miami Beach Featured in Elephant Magazine

Untitled takes a curatorial approach, combining 129 galleries from 20 different countries. This year the show is bright and bold, though that shouldn’t distract the viewer from the many conversations around gender, race and, of course, US politics.

Sadie Barnette Featured on The Culture Trip - Untitled, Miami Beach 2016

Sadie Barnette Featured on The Culture Trip - Untitled, Miami Beach 2016

Women Who Stole The Spotlight At Miami Art Week 2016

The booths and fair tents have now been vacated, and life in Miami restored to normal traffic woes. But the female voices present at Miami Art Week – an annual flurry of fairs that descend upon the city each December – have resonated far beyond these temporary events.

Tim Etchells' Forced Entertainment Present Complete Works: Table Top Shakespeare

Tim Etchells' Forced Entertainment Present Complete Works: Table Top Shakespeare

36 micro-performances for limited audiences seated on the Royce Hall Stage

One by one, over 6 days, Forced Entertainment performers condense 36 Shakespeare plays into a series of works of less than an hour each played out on a one meter tabletop – each play comically and intimately retold via a series of lovingly made miniatures and a collection of everyday unextraordinary objects.

LA Times Reviews Tim Etchells' Forced Entertainment Production of 'Table Top Shakespeare'

LA Times Reviews Tim Etchells' Forced Entertainment Production of 'Table Top Shakespeare'

My kingdom for a can of beans! A radical take on the Bard in 'Table Top Shakespeare'

To be, or not to be a bottle of balsamic vinegar, that is the question.

 

It really was the question, at least  when the unorthodox British performance troupe Forced Entertainment conceived of its latest project, “Table Top Shakespeare,” which runs Tuesday through Saturday at the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA.

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in The Root

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in The Root

16 Artists Who Made Sure Black Lives Mattered at Art Basel Miami Beach

The beauty of art is that it starts with one person’s dreams and ideas, which are then realized in a painting, sculpture or other art medium. From there it lives on forever, hopefully for all the world to see. That’s one reason it’s so important that the artwork of black artists, who often document the good and bad of our lives, flourish in this new, emerging worldview.

Jonathan Curiel of SF Weekly Reviews Viewpoints

Jonathan Curiel of SF Weekly Reviews Viewpoints

The Anxiety of Influence

In the past three years, McArthur Binion has been one of the art world’s bigger stories — celebrated for his grid paintings that play with people’s perceptions of surface and foundation, and celebrated for his re-emergence from a level of obscurity that had reduced him to a kind of footnote for 30 years.

 

Three months ago, Artspace canonized the Chicagoan as one of “108 international artists who are revolutionizing painting today.” A year earlier,Art+Auction magazine called Binion one of the world’s “25 most collectible mid-career artists.” And around the same time, the Wall Street Journallauded Binion’s paintings for their “beauty and meaning.”

Hyperallergic Features Sadie Barnette's Solo Exhibition at Untitled, Miami Beach

Hyperallergic Features Sadie Barnette's Solo Exhibition at Untitled, Miami Beach

Seeking a Human Connection at Miami Beach’s Untitled Art Fair

11/30/2016

Maybe it’s watching our democratic institutions threatened with dismantlement on a daily basis as a rich egomaniac with autocratic tendencies prepares to assume the US presidency, but I had trouble concentrating at the 2016 Untitled art fair. An air-conditioned, art-filled tent on a beach (in a city that’s sinking but refuses to reckon with climate change) is basically a physical manifestation of the neoliberal art world bubble; as someone without a stockpile of money, I did not feel reassured being inside it.

Ben Aronson Museum Exhibitions, throughout the United States and abroad

Ben Aronson Museum Exhibitions, throughout the United States and abroad

Shows in Japan, Germany, China, Poland, Myanmar, and the United States

Painter Ben Aronson's works will be featured in museum exhibitions throughout the United States and interntionally, including: The New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT; Takaoka Art Museum, Takaoka, Japan; The Orangerie, Gera, Germany; Taizhou Museum, Taizhou, China; The Mazovian Museum, Plock, Poland; Mon Cultural Museum, Mawlamyine, Myanmar.

Tim Etchells and Meg Stuart perform in Brussels, November 30 - December 2

Tim Etchells and Meg Stuart perform in Brussels, November 30 - December 2

"Shown and Told" at Kaaitheatre, Brussels

Tim Etchells, in collaboration with choreographer Meg Stuart, perform an improvised evening, "Shown & Told," at the Kaaitheatre in Brussels from November 30 - December 2, 2016.

BLACK PORTRAITURE[S] III

BLACK PORTRAITURE[S] III

Featuring Gallery Artists: Sadie Barnette, Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle, and Rin Johnson

BLACK PORTRAITURE[S] III: Reinventions: Strains of Histories and Cultures is the seventh conference in a series of conversations about imaging the black body. It offers a forum that gives artists, activists, and scholars from around the world an opportunity to share ideas from historical topics to current research on the 40th anniversary of Soweto. Presenters will engage a range of topics such as Biennales, the Africa Perspective in the Armory Show, the global art market, politics, tourism, sites of memory, Afrofuturism, fashion, dance, music, film, art, and photography.

 

The conference will be held November 17-19, 2016 in Johannesburg and held in collaboration with the U. S. Department of State, U.S. Ambassador to South Africa, Patrick H. Gaspard, Goodman Gallery, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research/Harvard University, New York University’s LaPietra Dialogues, Tisch School of the Arts and the Institute of African American Affairs.

Tim Etchells and Forced Entertainment at the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, November 10 - 12

Tim Etchells and Forced Entertainment at the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, November 10 - 12

The group offers a brief residency in Brighton, debuting new work

Tim Etchells and Forced Entertainment are partaking in a mini-residency at the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts in Brighton from November 10 - 12. The group will present the UK premiere of "Real Magic," their new performance directed by Etchells, and their 6-hour improvised durational work around storytelling, "And on the Thousandth Night."

Tim Etchells and Aisha Orazbayeva Perform in London, Friday November 11

Tim Etchells and Aisha Orazbayeva Perform in London, Friday November 11

A dynamic, improvised sound / voice performance, Seeping Through.

Tim Etchells and collaborator, violinist Aisha Orazabayeva, present their dynamic, improvised sound and voice performance "Seeping Through" at Tom Thumb Theatre in Margate on Friday, November 11.

Scott Fraser and Delaware Art Museum exhibition reviewed in Art & Antiques

Scott Fraser and Delaware Art Museum exhibition reviewed in Art & Antiques

Getting Real: A show at the Delaware Art Museum presents the many modes of contemporary realist painting

A few years ago, the artist Robert C. Jackson decided to write a book about contemporary realist painting. He chose 19 fellow artists whom he considered the most interesting, and instead of writing about them from his own point of view, he decided to interview them and let them explicate their own work. He also interviewed himself, bringing the total to 20. In 2014, the results were published in book form, along with reproductions of all the artists’ work, under the title Behind the Easel. The Pennsylvania-based Jackson, at 52 a senior and much-respected figure in the world of representational painting, had created a sort of democratic manifesto for contemporary realism, and now his book has become the basis of an exhibition at the Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington, “Truth and Vision: 21st Century Realism,” which opens on October 22 and runs through January 22.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's book SIR to be published by Litmus Press

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's book SIR to be published by Litmus Press

Litmus Press selects Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle's book SIR for publication, Fall 2017. Litmus calls her manuscript "timely and resonant with [their] mission... The cross-genre SIR articulates an intimate familial history that speaks urgently to the vulnerability of the black male body in the ongoing crisis of U.S. racial politics." 

Scott Fraser featured in Delaware Art Museum's Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism

Scott Fraser featured in Delaware Art Museum's Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism

October 22, 2016 - January 22, 2017

Gallery Artist Scott Fraser included in "Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism," inspired by Robert C. Jackson's 2014 publication, "Behind the Easel: The Unique Voices of 20 Contemporary Representational Painters."

Romare Bearden Featured in the New Yorker

Romare Bearden Featured in the New Yorker

Kerry James Marshall retrospective at the Met Breuer

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL’S AMERICA
An exhilarating retrospective at the Met Breuer is not an appeal for progress in race relations but a ratification of advances already made.

 

Marshall’s compliment to the Met is expressed by a show within the show, of works from the museum’s collection that he particularly values. He selected paintings by four modern African-American artists—Horace Pippin, Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, and Charles Wilbert White (a W.P.A. muralist who was an inspirational teacher of Marshall’s in college)—and three African sculptures: a Dan mask, a Senufo oracle figure, and a Bamana Boli (a featureless animal encrusted with “sacrificial” matter, including blood). But most of the works are by dead white men, from Veronese and Holbein through Ingres and Seurat to Balthus and de Kooning, with surprising nods to George Tooker, Paul Cadmus, and Andrew Wyeth. In each case, an intellectual spark leaps to some aspect of Marshall’s art: eloquent figurative distortion, from Ingres and de Kooning; dark tonality, from Seurat and Ad Reinhardt; and theatrical violence, from nineteenth-century Japanese prints. Only one choice baffled me: a blushy Bonnard nude, which feels antithetical to Marshall’s manner. (Is that the ironic point of its inclusion?)

Tony Lewis Featured in Culture Type

Tony Lewis Featured in Culture Type

 

The Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum held its annual fundraising gala in New York, a gathering of artists, curators and collectors, where 40 artists including Rashid Johnson, Tony Lewis, Rodney McMillian, and Adam Pendleton, were honored.

Viewpoints artist McArthur Binion profiled in Artspace

Viewpoints artist McArthur Binion profiled in Artspace

"I Made Myself Up!": Painter McArthur Binion on Foraging His Own Path in a White Art World

Painter McArthur Binion, featured in Viewpoints, was recently profiled by Artspace writer Loney Abrams.

Lavar Munroe Featured in Exhibtion at Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts

Lavar Munroe Featured in Exhibtion at Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts

The Ontology of Influence

Glycerin. Sheep brains. Embalmed specimens. Miscellaneous laboratory paraphernalia.

 

Since joining the Washington University faculty in 1986, artist Ron Leax has built a national reputation for rigorous yet playful sculptures and installations that explore the natural world while interrogating the language and concepts we use to describe it. In Leax’s work, the familiar taxonomies of empirical knowledge — books, catalogues, sample libraries — are overwhelmed by the very forces they seek to master.

Johnathan Payne Featured in Yale Daily News

Johnathan Payne Featured in Yale Daily News

“Queering” spaces at Yale

Concerns about representation and space continue to be on the forefront of on-campus discussions and not just within Yale College.

Jenkins Johnson Gallery at 1:54 Art Fair Featured on Artsy

Jenkins Johnson Gallery at 1:54 Art Fair Featured on Artsy

40 Male Nudes and a Tribute to Malick Sidibé Are the Highlights of This Year’s 1:54 London

The fourth edition of the 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in London opened Wednesday morning at Somerset House, the neoclassical palace overlooking the River Thames. This year, 1:54 is showcasing 40 galleries from 18 countries, representing a diverse spread of the vast African continent and its diaspora in the Victorian east and west wings of the Tudor mansion.

Melanie Pullen Participating in the Biennale Casablanca 2016

Melanie Pullen Participating in the Biennale Casablanca 2016

We the People
Yes, we the people, we are responsible for the world around us.
The first three words of the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States of America. 
Three words that remind the individual power of each and every one of us. Indeed, the world around us is built and transformed by individual acts put together: investment of economic actors, decision-intellectual position or opinion decisions leaders, political leaders, but also and especially succession individual actions that might be considered trivial but, repeated, become major. 

Top 500 Artists from the United States, Born 1966 or After

Top 500 Artists from the United States, Born 1966 or After

Melanie Pullen makes #314 on ArtNet's Top 500 Artists from the United States, Born 1966 or After.

Dear Europa … at WHATIFTHEWORLD Gallery

Dear Europa … at WHATIFTHEWORLD Gallery

Featuring New Work by Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle

Letters, hand-written, stamped and posted, are archaic throwbacks to a culture we nostalgically dub ‘slowness’ – slow food, slow beer, slow sex, slowed down hand-made things. The art gallery however has remained largely immune to this threat to slowness. Instead, in a witheringly ephemeral world the art gallery has thrived as the uber trading hub, temple, and outpost for the authenticity and provenance of things. An ‘alternative religion for atheists’, Sarah Thornton notes in Seven Days in the Art World, it is a reminder that faith in the fetish object, its ritualised practice, culture and economy, remains very much alive.

Hendrik Kerstens featured on the Cover of The Penguin Book of Dutch Short Stories

Hendrik Kerstens featured on the Cover of The Penguin Book of Dutch Short Stories

'We were kids - but good kids. If I may say so myself. We're much smarter now, so smart it's pathetic. Except for Bavink, who went crazy'

 

A husband forms gruesome plans for his new fridge; a government employee has a haunting experience on his commute home; prisoners serve as entertainment for wealthy party guests; an army officer suffers a monstrous tropical illness. These short stories contain some of the most groundbreaking and innovative writing in Dutch literature from 1915 to the present day, with most pieces appearing here in English for the first time. Blending unforgettable snapshots of the realities of everyday life with surrealism, fantasy and subversion, this collection shows Dutch writing to be an integral part of world literary history.

 

Joost Zwagerman (1963-2015) was a novelist, poet, essayist and editor of several anthologies. He started his career as a writer with bestselling novels, describing the atmosphere of the 1980s and 1990s, such as Gimmick!(1988) and False Light (1991). In later years, he concentrated on writing essays - notably on pop culture and visual arts - and poetry. Suicide was the theme of the novel Six Stars (2002). He took his own life just after having published a new collection of essays on art, The Museum of Light.

Arts & Extras: Women's art series at Virginia Tech launches with Roanoke artist

Arts & Extras: Women's art series at Virginia Tech launches with Roanoke artist

Featuring New Work by Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle

Hinkle’s work focuses on perceptions and misperceptions of the black female body, tackling issues of race head-on. She’ll give an artist talk Sept. 18 at 6:30 p.m. in the Moss Arts Center’s Merryman Family Learning Studio.

IN REAL LIFE: STUDIO

IN REAL LIFE: STUDIO

The Hammer Museum and Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle

In Real Life: Studio provides a glimpse into the working processes of artists. Throughout the fall a select group of artists utilizes spaces in the museum to convene and rehearse new material, including theater, dance, music, and performance. While some artists and collectives will simply discuss or workshop material, others will produce a new project from rehearsal to final performance.

ART AND AGENCY IN THE ACT, Interview Magazine

ART AND AGENCY IN THE ACT, Interview Magazine

Julia Fullerton-Batten's New Series

In her new fine art series "The Act," photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten addresses the sex industry through the women who choose to work within it. Presented individually on tailor-made sets, her subjects include escorts, porn stars, burlesque performers, strippers, erotic dancers, and a dominatrix. Each image is accompanied by an interview, conducted by Fullerton-Batten herself. At the heart of the project is an exploration of agency—as an adult, as a woman, as a sexual being. 

Julia Fullerton-Batten, The Act, 2016

Julia Fullerton-Batten, The Act, 2016

Fullerton-Batten's newest series featured on L'Oeil de la Photographie

My most recent projects have involved social commentary on various aspects of past and present society. The role of the sex industry in today’s society and sex-worker rights have been heavily debated and disputed in recent years. The content of these often heated discussions have interested me and I finally decided to take on the challenge of building a project around the work and lives of young women engaged in the sex industry. As a fine-art photographer and despite my own personal open-mindedness, I approached this particular project with some trepidation as I knew it could be controversial and, in some respects, overstep the boundary between erotic fine-art imagery and pornography. The project is comprehensive and includes main images of the women ‘at work’, personal portraits of each of them, a video and written ‘stories’ of their lives built up from my interviews with them.

Annie Kevans in The Collective at the House of St Barnabas, London

Annie Kevans in The Collective at the House of St Barnabas, London

The Collective, a contemporary art programme, consists of rotating exhibitions and a permanent collection. Through The House of St Barnabas’ spirit of collaboration and commitment to nurturing talent, the organisation invites artists, galleries and curators to either permanently donate or loan works to the club.  It shows a range of work, including pieces by Damien Hirst, The Chapman Brothers, Tracey Emin, Roxy Walsh and Tom Gallant.

Enticed by Realism

Enticed by Realism

The Provincetown, Massachusetts, Collection of Tom And Robert Adamson Displays Art By Leading Contemporary Realists.

The Provincetown, Massachusetts, Collection of Tom And Robert Adamson Displays Art By Leading Contemporary Realists. 

“We seldom go on art walks or to visit galleries. We rely heavily on the internet and on Karen Jenkins-Johnson and her galleries in San Francisco and New York...."

The Give & Take - Tim Etchells’ Residency for Tate Exchange at Tate Modern

The Give & Take - Tim Etchells’ Residency for Tate Exchange at Tate Modern

This week I’m in residence at Tate Modern, London, for the opening of Tate Exchange, located on Level 5 of the new building, Switch House. My programme consists of separate but overlapping events that run from Thursday 29 September until Sunday October 2nd.

 

Bunched under the name The Give & Take my residency explores the idea of exchange in different spheres of life, work and society; the complex processes by which we teach and learn from each other, the systems we are caught in that both frustrate and make possible our connection. The work itself is constructed as an exchange – a framework of events that’s built to encourage conversations, meetings, arguments, encounters between members of the public, artists and thinkers.

Tim Etchells' Eyes Looking in Times Square

Tim Etchells' Eyes Looking in Times Square

October 1, 2016 - October 31, 2016

In partnership with the French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) as part of FIAF’s 2016 Crossing the Line Festival, Times Square Arts will highlight the human details that bring us together with Tim Etchells’ Eyes Looking, which will appear on Times Square’s electronic billboards from 11:57 p.m. to midnight every night in October. This project is a part of Midnight Moment, a monthly presentation by the Times Square Advertising Coalition (TSAC) and Times Square Arts.

Fall preview: Bay Area Art Galleries

Fall preview: Bay Area Art Galleries

Featuring Sadie Barnette's FROM HERE

There has been a reshuffling of the deck as far as Bay Area galleries are concerned, especially in the city, where quite a few have moved from downtown and created art hubs in less centralized, more affordable locations, not to mention a proliferation of new galleries in Oakland as well as San Francisco. Too much to do justice to in this brief space, but, in microcosm, here's what's happening this fall.

MINDFUL LOOKING

MINDFUL LOOKING

Scott Fraser’s Three Fishermen

Join Teaching Specialist Molly Medakovich for an in-depth exploration of Scott Fraser’s Three Fishermen.

Getting Real

Getting Real

A show at the Delaware Art Museum presents the many modes of contemporary realist painting, featuring Scott Fraser

A few years ago, the artist Robert C. Jackson decided to write a book about contemporary realist painting. He chose 19 fellow artists whom he considered the most interesting, and instead of writing about them from his own point of view, he decided to interview them and let them explicate their own work. He also interviewed himself, bringing the total to 20. In 2014, the results were published in book form, along with reproductions of all the artists’ work, under the title Behind the Easel. The Pennsylvania-based Jackson, at 52 a senior and much-respected figure in the world of representational painting, had created a sort of democratic manifesto for contemporary realism, and now his book has become the basis of an exhibition at the Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington, “Truth and Vision: 21st Century Realism,” which opens on October 22 and runs through January 22.

Gordon Parks, photographer who chronicled African-American life, the focus of shows in Washington, DC and Berlin

Gordon Parks, photographer who chronicled African-American life, the focus of shows in Washington, DC and Berlin

The National Gallery has acquired 173 of his pictures to its collection, while a survey of his work starts its tour of Germany

The National Gallery of Art (NGA) in Washington, DC, has added 173 photographs by the American photographer Gordon Parks to its collection as part of an acquisition of 304 works from the now closed Corcoran Gallery of Art. Many of the works will be shown at the National Gallery as part of the exhibition Gordon Parks: The New Tide, 1940-50 (11 November 2018-18 February 2019), which surveys his early work.

Parks (1912-2006) was the kind of photographer whose work ranged widely. He chronicled crime in American cities like Chicago, where he visited a morgue to document the aftermath of murder. He photographed the March on Washington in 1963, for which 250,000 people came out to hear Martin Luther King Jr give his “I Have a Dream” speech. He did high fashion shoots for Life and Vogue magazines on the streets of New York, reported on segregation in the American South and visited Alexander Calder in his Connecticut studio. He even followed Muhammad Ali to Miami in 1970 to profile the fighter just before his first match in more than three years following his suspension for refusing to go to Vietnam.

Carol Prusa's Work Acquired by Museum of Arts and Design, New York City

Carol Prusa's Work Acquired by Museum of Arts and Design, New York City

Carol Prusa's Bridge was recently acquired by the Museum of Arts and Design, New York City The mission of the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is to collect, display, and interpret objects that document contemporary and historic innovation in craft, art, and design. In its exhibitions and educational programs, the Museum celebrates the creative process through which materials are crafted into works that enhance contemporary life.

Carol Prusa in Residency at Berengo Foundation in Murano, Italy

Carol Prusa in Residency at Berengo Foundation in Murano, Italy

Fondazione Berengo sponsors a program to further its commitment to keeping the glassmaking traditions of Murano alive. The program is designed to allow students and artists who have worked in glass to develop and refine their skills by working in a traditional Murano furnace. The residents are encouraged to experiment with both traditional and innovative processes involving glass as a medium consistent with the foundation’s mission. Artists work side-by side with the glass maestros who provide guidance and a hands-on experience.

The resident will work in the Berengo Studio furnace on Murano which is designed to accommodate a wide variety of glass working techniques. In addition to furnaces for blowing and casting, the factory contains a cold-working facility and annealing ovens, designed for blowing, casting or kiln forming. 

Generally, the Fondazione Berengo requires that the resident be sponsored by an educational or cultural institution. The length of the residency varies, depending on an individual’s experience, the project and, if applicable, the requirements of the sponsoring institution. A stipend for living expenses is provided.

Muholi is Africa’s most powerful female artist

Muholi is Africa’s most powerful female artist

Visual activist Zanele Muholi, who hails from Umlazi in KwaZulu-Natal, is officially the most powerful female artist in Africa, according to ArtReview magazine’s annual Power 100 list of influencers in the contemporary art world.

 

Muholi, who made it on the list at position 95, joins big names such as Nigerian curator Okwui Enwezor (at number 20) and South African artist William Kentridge at position 62.

 

ArtReview describes Muholi as a “Johannesburg-based photographer, film maker and self-titled ‘visual activist’ at the forefront of both celebrating the existence of, and campaigning against the violence faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex communities in her native South Africa and beyond”.

Lalla Essaydi Exhibits at The Kimura Gallery of the University of Alaska Anchorage

Lalla Essaydi Exhibits at The Kimura Gallery of the University of Alaska Anchorage

In a land far away, where the halls are lined with student and faculty work, where your imagination is brought to life, lies the Kimura Art Gallery.

 

Located on the second floor of the art building, most students outside of the art department have never heard of the internationally renowned gallery lying just on the other side of campus. The Kimura Gallery has shown work from artists all over the world, and their hope, according to their website, is to show a “space that provides students, faculty, and the community with the opportunity to view and experience artwork that explores national and international contemporary culture.”

 

The Kimura Gallery is made possible by Charles Licka, his wife Geanne Ilgen, and Becky White. Their hard work and dedication to the gallery is what keeps everything running smoothly.

Timotheus Tomicek in Exhibition at Eyes On in Vienna

Timotheus Tomicek in Exhibition at Eyes On in Vienna

In a very personal portrait series Arrivals and Departures Jacob Aue Sobol tells of his journey on the Trans-Siberian Railway across the Asian continent. Kajsa Gullberg observed in her hometown Copenhagen that in February, the highest suicide rates are always recorded, and arranged in response sumptuous still life with roses, peonies and lilies in the series winter depression . 

Timotheus Tomicek in Garden of Earthly Delights

Timotheus Tomicek in Garden of Earthly Delights

Following on from the success of Paradise Lost in 2014, tactileBOSCH are delighted to be taking part in Cardiff Contemporary once again to produce Garden of Earthly Delights.  Garden of Earthly Delights will be a dizzying array of site-specific installation, video, painting, photography, sculpture, sonic art, interdisciplinary collaborations and spontaneous interventions. Come and join us at the launch.

 

As you begin a journey of discovery through the atmospheric Custom & Immigration building, you will be completely immersed, interacting with art works, music and live performance. Local, national and international artists provide a contemporary response to the Hieronymous BOSCH (Garden of Earthly Delights) tryptych in a celebration of his 500 year anniversary. Over 70 artists are taking part in the exhibition with various events happening over the month.

Hendrik Kerstens in Exhibtion at Monash Art Gallery

Hendrik Kerstens in Exhibtion at Monash Art Gallery

Dutch masters of light: Hendrik Kerstens and Erwin Olaf

This exhibition features work by the internationally acclaimed Dutch photographers, Hendrik Kerstens and Erwin Olaf. Inspired by the moody manipulation of light and shadow that characterises the paintings of Dutch masters such as Rembrandt and Vermeer, these photographers create emotionally charged portraits that draw attention to the liminal nature of contemporary life.

 

Dutch masters of light: Hendrik Kerstens and Erwin Olaf is part of a series of events that mark the 400th anniversary of the first Dutch contact with Western Australia. On 25 October 1616, Dirk Hartog made landfall with his ship the Eendracht at Dirk Hartog Island, in the Shark Bay area.

Ben Aronson Featured in the Hartford Courant

Ben Aronson Featured in the Hartford Courant

New England Images Heavy Focus Of 'As We See It' At NBMAA

Ben Aronson, who creates street scenes in New York, Paris and San Francisco, uses a style that is a curious combination of specific and vague.

Ben Aronson in Group Exhibtion at New Britain Museum of American Art

Ben Aronson in Group Exhibtion at New Britain Museum of American Art

As We See It: The Collection of Gail and Ernst von Metzsch will feature over 80 paintings by more than 30 American artists, whose careers have been championed by Boston-based collectors Ernst and Gail von Metzsch throughout their 36 years of collecting.

Kenyatta A.C Hinkle Artist Resideny at Atlantic Center for the Arts

Kenyatta A.C Hinkle Artist Resideny at Atlantic Center for the Arts

Atlantic Center for the Arts is a nonprofit interdisciplinary artists' community and arts education facility dedicated to promoting artistic excellence by providing talented midcareer artists an opportunity to work and collaborate with some of the world's most distinguished contemporary artists in the fields of music composition, and the visual, literary, and performing arts. Community interaction is coordinated through on-site and outreach presentations, workshops and exhibitions.

Tony Lewis Featured in ArtNet News

Tony Lewis Featured in ArtNet News

Actor Russell Tovey Gets Personal About His Art Collection

Fans may recognize Russell Tovey as the beleaguered werewolf in BBC’sBeing Human, Patrick’s love interest in HBO’s Looking, or, more recently, as the enigmatic new character on ABC’s runaway hit Quantico. But what may be lesser-known about the actor is his off-screen relationship with contemporary art—a serious passion he regularly touts on Instagram.

Romare Bearden Featured in ArtNet News

Romare Bearden Featured in ArtNet News

Is the Art Market Racially Biased?

African American artists have lately become the focus of new levels of attention in the museum sphere, and an artnet analysis of auction data shows a rising market for a distinct group of black artists in the last eight years—coincidentally or not, during the term of America’s first black president.

 

This recent recognition of African American artists has been a long time coming. Many observers have pointed out that Western art galleries and museums have long shown and collected many more white male artists than people of color or women. To find out how African American artists fare at auction, we take a look at data from the last 30 years, focusing on American artists born after 1955. For this analysis, rather than individual prices, we focus on auction volume (the total of their sales in a given year), which offers a broader reflection of the appetite for artists’ work.

Gordon Parks Solo Exhibtion at C/O Berlin

Gordon Parks Solo Exhibtion at C/O Berlin

I am you. Selected Works 1942 - 1978

A camera does not just shoot images. It is a powerful instrument against oppression, racism, violence and inequality.Gordon Parks has described the camera as his choice of weapon, and his life has used the medium of photography intelligently and enlighteningly to show the shadows of the American way of life and to mediate between the groups of a fragmented society. As an important chronicler of the struggle for equality of African Americans he treated issues such as poverty, exclusion and injustice that have lost none of its urgency. 

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair

October 9, 2016

San Francisco’s Jenkins Johnson Gallery presents Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle’s intimate collages which interrogate narratives around the black female body, history and power. In these works, the tactile collage technique operates to dismantle any fixed notions of identity, instead bringing about new and transformative visions that forcefully challenge stereotype and convention.

Video: What’s On Africa At 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 2016

Video: What’s On Africa At 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 2016

October 7, 2016

London’s biggest festival of contemporary African culture has returned with a bang for its fourth edition; taking place at Somerset House, one of London’s most iconic venues, 1:54 has established a reputation as a place of discover and the key place to acquire contemporary African art in Europe. This year, What’s On Africa contributor, Luar Klinghofer was at the fair, to bring you highlights from the first few days.

Jenkins Johnson Gallery Exhibiting at 1:54

Jenkins Johnson Gallery Exhibiting at 1:54

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair In London Announces Exhibitor List

The 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair has announced the 40 galleries from 18 countries that will be exhibiting at the fair’s fourth London edition, to be held at Somerset House from October 6 to 9, during Frieze Week.

As usual, this year’s fair will display the work of artists from Africa and its diasporas—more than 110 in total this year. FORUM, the fair’s educational wing, also returns to the fair, offering a variety of programming curated by Koyo Kouoh, the artistic director of the RAW Materials Company arts center in Dakar, Senegal.

Gordon Parks Exhibition at the Columbus Museum

Gordon Parks Exhibition at the Columbus Museum

On September 24, 1956, against the backdrop of the Montgomery bus boycott, Life magazine published a photo essay titled “The Restraints: Open and Hidden.” Staff photographer Gordon Parks had traveled to Mobile and Shady Grove, Alabama, to document the lives of the related Thornton, Causey, and Tanner families in the “Jim Crow” South. As the Civil Rights Movement began to gain momentum, Parks chose to focus on the activities of everyday life in these African- American families – Sunday shopping, children playing, doing laundry – over-dramatic demonstrations. Guest curated by Columbus Staten University students, Gordon Parks – Segregation Story features 12 photographs from “The Restraints,” now in the collection of the Do Good Fund, a Columbus-based nonprofit that lends its collection of contemporary Southern photography to a variety of museums, nonprofit galleries, and non-traditional venues. Students’ reflections, enhanced by a research trip to Mobile, offer contemporary thoughts on works that were purposely designed to present ordinary people quietly struggling against discrimination. As the readers of Lifeconfronted social inequality in their weekly magazine, Parks subtly exposed segregation’s damaging effects while challenging racial stereotypes.

Karen Jenkins-Johnson Awarded Business Person of the Year Award

Karen Jenkins-Johnson Awarded Business Person of the Year Award

San Rafael businesswoman honored by National Council of Negro Women

September 29, 2016

The Golden Gate section of the National Council of Negro Women has named San Rafael resident Karen Jenkins-Johnson, owner of Jenkins Johnson Gallery in San Francisco, as its Business Person of the Year.

Annie Kevans Exhibiting In 'Fifteen Minutes'

Annie Kevans Exhibiting In 'Fifteen Minutes'

Cornell Art Museum at Old School Square presents a new exhibition that focuses on the idea of fame and different ways it can be interpreted through artwork. Andy Warhol once stated, “everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes,” hence the title of this exhibit. The contemporary works included have been shown in galleries and museums worldwide.



Fifteen Minutes is a group show of works that express the idea of celebrity and works by artists who have become celebrities themselves. This exhibition includes two works by Andy Warhol, Blackglama (Judy Garland), 1985 and Portrait of Olga Berde Mahl, 1986.  Other participating artists include Annie Kevans, Jemima Kirke (actress from the hit HBO series, “Girls”), Robert Mars, Jack Newmann, Nathan Ritterpusch, Daniel Stanford, Ken Tate and Russell Young. 

Hendrik Kerstens in Exhibtion at Reiss Engelhorn Museum in Mannheim, Germany

Hendrik Kerstens in Exhibtion at Reiss Engelhorn Museum in Mannheim, Germany

Baroque, Only Beautiful Appearance?

Lush women, powdered wigs, decadent feasts and magnificent monuments? For a long time the Baroque era was brought solely in connection with clichéd notions. But a closer look at the European cultural history of the years 1580 to 1770 brings surprises to light: advanced knowledge in medicine, a classical antique ideal of beauty, pioneering economic developments, scientific rationality and an all-pervasive order structure.

Timotheus Tomicek Solo Exhibition at Kunstverein Recklinghausen

Timotheus Tomicek Solo Exhibition at Kunstverein Recklinghausen

Va-ge

Timotheus Tomicek is an Austrian artist, filmmaker and photographer.He was born in 1978 in Vienna and studied at the Vienna Film Academy / Paris. Tomicek is known in his artistic activity for its inconsistent cross-media operation.

Gordon Parks Featured in the Economist

Gordon Parks Featured in the Economist

The year of the great Gordon Parks

August 31, 2016

Half a century ago in America, nonviolent protests and acts of civil disobedience, organised by leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, helped put the spotlight on the bigotry and injustice that black Americans faced. The civil-rights movement prompted lawmakers to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964, outlawing discrimination based on "race, color, religion, sex or national origin", and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. A fifty-something African-American photographer Gordon Parks, who also directed the Blaxploitation film “Shaft” in 1971 and co-founded “Essence” magazine in 1970, was an integral part of that movement, from taking intimate portraits of the characters involved, to photographing the myriad rallies that took place in the 1950s and 1960s. Yet Parks, who straddled protest and photography, remains outside the pantheon of great black leaders in civil rights, and is less known than his mostly white contemporaries in photography. 

Gordon Parks Featured in TIME

Gordon Parks Featured in TIME

Ingrid Bergman: How a Photograph Never Made Led to Her Most Memorable Portrait

August 28, 2016

When LIFE photographer Gordon Parks decided not to snap his shutter on the Swedish-born actress--who was born 100 years ago on Aug. 29--it paved the way for one of the most treasured portraits of her ever made

Gordon Parks Exhibition at the Harvard Art Museum

Gordon Parks Exhibition at the Harvard Art Museum

Vision and Justice: The Art of Citizenship

This University Teaching Gallery installation examines the contested relationship between art, justice, and African American culture from the 19th through 21st century in the United States. The over 40 works on display range from prints by Kara Walker and Glenn Ligon that challenge the nexus between vision and justice during slavery to photographs by Bruce Davidson and Gordon Parks that synoptically summarize events from the segregation era through the civil rights movement.

Gordon Parks at the Virginia Museum of Fine Art

Gordon Parks at the Virginia Museum of Fine Art

Gordon Parks: Back to Fort Scott

This exhibition examines the realities of life under segregation in 1950s America, as seen through the lens of groundbreaking photographer Gordon Parks (1912–2006). As the first African American photographer hired full time by Life magazine, Parks was frequently given assignments involving social issues affecting black America. In 1950, one such project took him back to his hometown in Kansas for a photo essay he planned to call “Back to Fort Scott.”

Ben Aronson in Urban Banality at The San Diego Museum of Art

Ben Aronson in Urban Banality at The San Diego Museum of Art

The city has been a subject of art for several decades: artists observing, criticizing, and celebrating our relationship to the built environment. This selection of American works provides a glimpse into how our urban world has evolved. 

Interview with Melanie Pullen in the Photographic Journal

Interview with Melanie Pullen in the Photographic Journal

July 7, 2016

Over the years, we have interviewed many iconic and influential photographers, but none have affected me like Melanie Pullen. Her curiosity in pushing the limits of her viewership is extremely endearing, and her work takes aim at a violence that has now become an all-too-standard aspect of modern media. The way she talks about her work is very precise, she is fully aware of what she wants to convey, but she also allows room for it to take on a life of its own, which can be a very delicate balance to achieve. If I had a list of past interviewees who I would love to learn from, Melanie would be at the very top. -SuzAnne Steben, Managing Editor

‘Invisible Man: Gordon Parks and Ralph Ellison in Harlem’ Review: Fruits of a Creative Friendship

‘Invisible Man: Gordon Parks and Ralph Ellison in Harlem’ Review: Fruits of a Creative Friendship

At the Art Institute of Chicago, an exhibition looks at the relationship between the photographer and author as they were becoming famous.

Gordon Parks (1912-2006) never got much respect from art museums when he was alive. A staff photographer for Life magazine from 1948 to 1972, renowned for stories on poverty, African-American and celebrity themes, he was older, and more conventional, than the wild tribes of frame-bending street shooters favored by curators in the 1960s and 70s.

Hendrik Kerstens in Exhibtion at the Musée Chateau de Penthes in Geneve

Hendrik Kerstens in Exhibtion at the Musée Chateau de Penthes in Geneve

Rembrandt in Geneva. When the Netherlands meets Switzerland

No other artist more than Rembrandt evokes the richness of the Dutch Golden Age. As well as the master of Leyden is known for his paintings, he has made about three hundreds etchings. Selected from one and the same private art collection, one hundred of them are exhibited at Penthes. Portraits and self-portraits, Biblical and historical scenes or simple street scenes reveal the Master’s talent for capturing movement, light and shadow, and imbuing his subjects with expressions of lifelike immediacy. An app on tablet, especially designed for the exhibition, will give the visitors every details they’ll need to explore the works of Rembrandt.

 

In introduction of the exhibition and as enlighment of the meeting between the Netherlands and Switzerland, a presentation of the historical moments and unknown ties will show how closed and connected the two countries are.

LIFE magazine's rare photos of Muhammad Ali

LIFE magazine's rare photos of Muhammad Ali

Acclaimed LIFE magazine photographer Gordon Parks photographed boxing great Muhammad Ali, who died June 3, 2016, at a pivotal time in Ali's life in 1966 and 1970. Parks created a "psychological portrait" of the boxer with these unique, intimate photos -- some of which have never been seen before -- during a period in which Ali changed his name from Cassius Clay, converted to Islam and declared himself a conscientious objector to the Vietnam War.

Gordon Parks Featured in the New York Times

Gordon Parks Featured in the New York Times

Muhammad Ali Dies at 74: Titan of Boxing and the 20th Century

Muhammad Ali, the three-time world heavyweight boxing champion who helped define his turbulent times as the most charismatic and controversial sports figure of the 20th century, died on Friday in a Phoenix-area hospital. He was 74.

His death was confirmed by Bob Gunnell, a family spokesman. Ali, who lived in Phoenix, had had Parkinson’s disease for more than 30 years. He was admitted to the hospital on Friday with what Mr. Gunnell said was a respiratory problem, but no other details were provided.

Ali was the most thrilling if not the best heavyweight ever, carrying into the ring a physically lyrical, unorthodox boxing style that fused speed, agility and power more seamlessly than that of any fighter before him.

But he was more than the sum of his athletic gifts. An agile mind, a buoyant personality, a brash self-confidence and an evolving set of personal convictions fostered a magnetism that the ring alone could not contain. He entertained as much with his mouth as with his fists, narrating his life with a patter of inventive doggerel. (“Me! Wheeeeee!”)

Hendrik Kerstens Featured on the Cover of SF Arts Monthly

Hendrik Kerstens Featured on the Cover of SF Arts Monthly

Portraiture From Around The Globe

Portraits that reflect personal and cultural identity are the focus of "Portraiture: A Group Photography Exhibtion", on display at Jenkins Johnson Gallerythrough July 9. Above, "Tails I," 2014, Hendrik Kerstens.

Gordon Parks Featured in the New York Times

Gordon Parks Featured in the New York Times

Gordon Parks and Ralph Ellison, Artistic Giants of Postwar Harlem

Masters of their fields, the photographer Gordon Parks and the writer Ralph Ellison bonded over a shared vision of using their creative talents to address racial injustice. That commitment led to the powerful, enduring 1952 photo essay “A Man Becomes Invisible.”

But that Life magazine project was not their only collaboration. A new exhibition, “Invisible Man: Gordon Parks and Ralph Ellison in Harlem,” for the first time shows images from a lesser-known 1948 project of theirs, “Harlem Is Nowhere.” On view through Aug. 28 at the Art Institute of Chicago, the exhibition offers the two men’s counternarrative (the reality, that is) of the living conditions of black Americans during that time. Among the show’s more than 50 objects — the known surviving material belonging to both “A Man Becomes Invisible” and “Harlem Is Nowhere” — are newly discovered images, photographs that have never been exhibited and items that had not been definitely identified as belonging to either project.

Gordon Parks Exhibtion at the Art Institute of Chicago

Gordon Parks Exhibtion at the Art Institute of Chicago

Invisible Man: Gordon Parks and Ralph Ellison in Harlem

Gordon Parks and Ralph Ellison are both recognized as major figures in American art and literature: Parks, a renowned photographer and filmmaker, was best known for his poignant and humanizing photo-essays for Life magazine. Ellison authored one of the most acclaimed—and debated—novels of the 20th century, Invisible Man (1952). What is less known about these two esteemed artists is that their friendship, coupled with a shared vision of racial injustices and a belief in the communicative power of photography, inspired collaboration on two projects, one in 1948 and another in 1952.

Sally Mann and Portraiture: A Group Photography Exhibition Featured in The Bay Area Reporter

Sally Mann and Portraiture: A Group Photography Exhibition Featured in The Bay Area Reporter

In the Eyes & Minds of Beholders

The unself-conscious, joyfully naked children in the photographs of Sally Mann are like forest sprites, splashing in the cool water of a muddy river at twilight, frolicking in the languid Southern summer, or swooping through the primordial woods within whose depths lurks black magic. That's the uneasy spell cast by Mann, a respected photographer who, as a young mother with three youngsters, enlisted her children to be her models. It was a critical decision that has yielded mythic, nostalgic, even feral black & white pictures and no small amount of controversy. The response to the children's nudity, in particular, has led to censorship in several prominent publications and sometimes obscured her artistic accomplishment. There have been objections to her kids being too young to understand the implications of their poses, some of which are provocative; accusations of child abuse; fear of pedophiles and stalkers; as well as child pornography laws that threaten the artist and the pursuit of her work. Though Mann has said she thinks "childhood sexuality is an oxymoron," and emphatically stated that her photographs are not erotic, it's what's in the eye and mind of beholders that's troubling and difficult to reconcile.

Sally Mann Featured in The San Francisco Chronicle

Sally Mann Featured in The San Francisco Chronicle

Sally Mann’s notorious family photos on exhibit in S.F.

The exceptional intimacy of Sally Mann’s “Immediate Family” photos has been famous, and famously controversial, ever since their publication in 1992. In Mann’s uncommonly beautiful decadelong series, her three children — Emmett, Jessie and Virginia — are captured from toddlerhood through adolescence, at play and at rest. They’re captured striking adventurous and languorous poses, often unclothed, on the family’s sprawling property in the rural Virginia hills.

Hendrik Kerstens in Exhibition at Museum of Photographic Arts

Hendrik Kerstens in Exhibition at Museum of Photographic Arts

Beauty and the Beast: The Animal in Photography

Beauty and the Beast presents an examination of animals in photography in celebration of the San Diego Zoo Centennial. Showcasing a diverse range of photographers, the exhibition highlights the many ways animals are featured from portraits to supporting subjects.

Sally Mann Featured in Art Daily

Sally Mann Featured in Art Daily

Jenkins Johnson Gallery opens first solo exhibition by renowned American photographer Sally Mann

Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco announces its first solo exhibition by renowned American photographer Sally Mann. Emmett, Jessie, and Virginia features intimate black and white silver gelatin prints of the American South that highlight childhood and the growth of Mann’s three children Emmett, Jessie, and Virginia from her acclaimed series Immediate Family (1992) and At 12: Portraits of Young Women (1988). The show runs from May 5 to July 9, 2016 with an opening reception on Thursday, May 5, 5:30 to 7:30. Running concurrently with Emmett, Jessie, and Virginia is Portraiture: A Group Photography Exhibition that features ethnically diverse and world-renowned artists, whose portraits reflect their personal and cultural identity, while also utilizing paint, props, pattern, and the lack thereof to emphasize their subject.

Aida Muluneh Participation in the Dak'Art Biennale

Aida Muluneh Participation in the Dak'Art Biennale

Congratulations to Aida Muluneh for her participation in the Dak'Art Biennale

Lavar Munroe Participation in the Dak'Art Biennale

Lavar Munroe Participation in the Dak'Art Biennale

Congratulations to Lavar Munroe for his participation in the Dak'Art Biennale

Lavar Munroe Featured in Modern Painters

Lavar Munroe Featured in Modern Painters

Uncomfortable Expressions A Caribbean Artist's Raw, Figurative Expression

"There are no couches or cushioned seating in my studio," says young Bahamian artist Lavar Munroe, "because for me the studio is not a place to be comfortable." For Munroe, his studio in Washington, D.C., is a "sacred space," a place to turn off his phone, disconnect from the internet, and delve deeply into a process that he trusts but can rarely predict where it will lead.

Sally Mann Featured in SF Arts Monthly

Sally Mann Featured in SF Arts Monthly

Gallery Highlights Sally Mann

This first solo exhibition by internationally-renowned photographer Sally Mann highlights intimate black and white silver gelatin prints of Mann's three children's daily lives, curated from her acclaimed series Immediate Family. The show also features Mann's photographs of adolescent girls on the cusp of womanhood from the series At 12: Portraits of Young Women.

Zanele Muholi Recieves the 2016 ICP’s Infinity Award for Documentary and Photojournalism

Zanele Muholi Recieves the 2016 ICP’s Infinity Award for Documentary and Photojournalism

Shifting the Negative: An Evening with Zanele Muholi

An award-winning photographer and 2016 recipient of ICP’s Infinity Award for Documentary and Photojournalism, Muholi presented several portraits from her recent book, Faces and Phases, a clip from Zanele Muholi, Visual Activist co-produced with Human Rights Watch, and a selection of recent self-portraits. Working with and within the communities she belongs to, Muholi situates her work as visual activism out of necessity. Inseparable from her very existence is an irreversible sense of urgency: “one of the most painful parts of photographing the community is when someone dies.”

Lalla Essaydi at the Washington Post

Lalla Essaydi at the Washington Post

5 Striking Photographs that Challenge Stereotypes of Arab and Iranian Women

“Actively avoiding offensive stereotypes is pretty much one of the most important things I could do,” Moroccan-born, New York-based photographer Lalla Essaydi says. “I take on art history writ large, undermining European artists’ objectifying and exoticizing representations of North African women.” Essaydi used thousands of bullet casings to create “Bullets Revisited #3.” The triptych turns “the domestic space into a psychological one, charged with contemporary realities,” she says. The text on the woman’s skin is deliberately indecipherable, Essaydi says, to challenge “the European assumption that text constitutes the best access to reality.”

Lalla Essaydi at the Washington Post

Lalla Essaydi at the Washington Post

A woman’s place in the Middle East? For some, it’s behind a camera.

The title of a new exhibition at the National Museum of Women in the Arts , “She Who Tells a Story,” undersells the high quality of the work therein. The name is borrowed from an Arabic word, rawiya, which also refers to a group of female photographers working as a collective in the Middle East. But the title makes it sound as if this provocative show — devoted to photography by women from Iran and the Arab world — is just another exercise in narrative, just more storytelling, a needless addition to the overflowing swamp of narrative that drowns out critical thinking.

Lavar Munroe Featured in Hyperallergic

Lavar Munroe Featured in Hyperallergic

The Spectacle of the “Other” in a Grotesque Zoo

SAVANNAH, Georgia — Contrary to his gentle voice and friendly manner, Lavar Munroe’s first U.S. museum exhibition, Journey Elsewhere: Musings from a Boundless Zoo, is filled with grotesque half-animal, half-human figures wielding hostile gloves and knives like predators. Currently on display at the SCAD Museum and the Gutstein Gallery in Savannah, Georgia, the Washington, DC–based artist’s paintings, sculpture, and installation explore the politics of power, subjugation, and othering. Munroe’s personal version of the contemporary zoo was inspired by his interest as an undergraduate in the “human zoos” that exhibited Native Americans and Africans through the 1950s, as well as his memories of death and violence while growing up in the Bahamas.

Carlos Javier Ortiz Wins 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship for Film and Video

Carlos Javier Ortiz Wins 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship for Film and Video

Carlos Javier Ortiz is a filmmaker and documentary photographer who focuses on urban life, gun violence, racism, poverty and marginalized communities. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in a variety of venues including the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts; the International Museum of Photography and Film in Rochester, NY; the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago; the Detroit Institute of Arts; and the Library of Congress. In addition, his photos were used to illustrate Ta-Nehisi Coates’ The Case for Reparations (2014) article, which was the best selling issue in the history of The Atlantic Magazine. His photos have also been published in The New Yorker, Mother Jones, among many others. He is represented by the Karen Jenkins-Johnson Gallery in San Francisco.

Tim Etchells and Forced Entertainment Featured in Artforum

Tim Etchells and Forced Entertainment Featured in Artforum

Speech Act, Tom Seller on Forced Entertainment

Most artistic collaboration is ad hoc and short-lived. But what happens when it goes on for decades, and yet takes place within the most ephemeral of genres, live performance? This probably wasn't the question a group of University of Exeter drama graduates set out to answer in 1984 when founding a company that was not quite traditional artists' collective and not quite traditional theater group.

Gordon Parks Featured in the San Francisco Chronicle

Gordon Parks Featured in the San Francisco Chronicle

Gordon Parks exhibit sheds light on race then and now

March 30, 2016

Gordon Parks Featured in Visual Art Source

Gordon Parks Featured in Visual Art Source

Gordon Parks

The racist elements so visible in this year’s political scene give the lie to the notion, bruited about in certain circles a decade ago, that we as a society no longer discriminate; that we have become "post-racial." The documentary photographer Gordon Parks (1912-2006), who covered the civil rights movement for decades, notably for Life magazine, would not have been amused or fooled. A large selection of his works in black and white as well as color shows us amnesiacs a review of history as if written by lightning (to paraphrase southerner Woodrow Wilson’s praise for the racist 1915 film "The Birth of a Nation"). Selections from photo essays on the 1963 march on Washington and the Black Muslim and Black Panther movements depict the turbulent sixties, when President Johnson’s support for civil rights effectively delivered the south to the once-abolitionist GOP. 

Tim Etchells and Forced Entertainment Win the International Ibsen Award

Tim Etchells and Forced Entertainment Win the International Ibsen Award

Jenkins Johnson Gallery congratulates Tim Etchells and Forced Entertainment on the International Ibsen Award.

The International Ibsen Award was established in 2007 and is regarded as one of the world’s most prestigious theatre prizes. Just last month The Spalding Gray National Consortium named Tim Etchells as the recipient of the 2016 Spalding Gray Award. The Forced Entertainment theatre collective was established in Sheffield, England by Tim Etchells in 1984, and the group is renowned for its ground-breaking, genre-defying theatrical approach. Forced Entertainment have made their mark within performance theatre in particular, but in recent years have also investigated the theatrical possibilities of exploiting the potential of video and digital platforms. In its statement, the International Ibsen Award Committee said that “the committee has chosen to honour this continually surprising and not least entertaining theatre group, because Forced Entertainment revive and challenge the theatre, and recognise and utilise the power inherent in the art form. Forced Entertainment take the theatre’s role within society deeply seriously." 

Poliixeni Papapetrou Featured in The Sydney Morning Herald

Poliixeni Papapetrou Featured in The Sydney Morning Herald

The Elvis Cult: Photographs of the Star's Enduring Fans

Each year on August 16, a throng of faithful mourners gather in Melbourne cemetery to commemorate the death of their idol: Elvis Presley. They are dressed in leather jackets, some with their hair greased back, most with large bunches of flowers, striking sultry poses in worship of the American star. It was 1985 when photographerPolixeni Papapetrou first encountered this annual ritual and was drawn to document the near-religious-scale cult.

 

Her series Elvis Immortal, which charts these earnest pilgrims over a 15 year period in black and white square format, is on show at Ararat Regional art gallery, Victoria.

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in Tayo Literary Magazine

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in Tayo Literary Magazine

Special Issue: Say Her Name

This, a Special Issue of TAYO Literary Magazine, in support of the #SayHerName movement, focuses exclusively on the lives of black women affected by their interactions with State sanctioned violence on the street.

In it, find salient vignettes from Jasmine Evans, a Hurston Wright Founding Members Award finalist in Fiction; fellow Co–Guest Editor rahdiyah ayobami, a critical essay from the Amanda Davis Prose finalist; gorgeously unrelenting poetry from Zoe Flowers, Tara Betts, Kira Allen, Melodic Rose; raw, brilliant, and visceral art from the interdisciplinary visual artist, writer, and performer Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle; and other black women writers raising their voices in cacophonic unison from across the nation. They write over the silence.

Gordon Parks Featured in SF Arts Monthly

Gordon Parks Featured in SF Arts Monthly

Gallery Highlights GordonParks: Higher Ground

Gordon Parks: Higher Ground. Presenting a solo exhibition of over sixty works by one of the most important photojournalists of the 20th century. Parks (1912 - 2006) was the first black photojournalist to work at Life magazine, from 1948 to 1972. Through Life, Parks documented the stories of those he photographed, personalizing his assignments to tell the broader story of the African American experience. The gallery's second solo exhibition for Parks will commemorate his photo essays on the Civil Rights Movement.

Gordon Parks Featured in Timeout San Francisco

Gordon Parks Featured in Timeout San Francisco

6 Art Gallery Exhibits to See in March

With so many things to do in San Francisco, it's easy to miss the many fantastic art exhibits and shows that pass through smaller galleries, as opposed to big museum shows. While it's nearly impossible for even the most ardent art lover to see it all, we've once again curated a collection of must see exhibits currently (or soon to be) gracing the walls of San Francisco's finest art spaces. Plan accordingly.

Gordon Parks Featured in The Huffington Post

Gordon Parks Featured in The Huffington Post

The Importance Of Photography In The Fight For Civil Rights; How Gordon Parks made the camera his weapon, changing America forever.

Some images are difficult to ignore. The dashboard camera footage of Sandra Bland's arrest, three days before her wrongful death in prison. The still image of Michael Brown's body covered by a sheet, just after the unarmed 18-year-old was fatally shot by a police officer. Protest photos of massive crowds bearing a single message, so simple it's absurd: "Black Lives Matter."

A camera is not in itself political. But the photographic tool carries with it the potential for widespread awareness, reform and revolution. Contemporary protest movements are propelled by the images and videos circulating across social media, broadcasting in plain sight the systemic injustices and atrocities still inextricably linked with blackness in America.

Gordon Parks Featured in Mas de Art

Gordon Parks Featured in Mas de Art

Gordon Parks, white and black against segregation

"I realized that the camera could be a weapon against poverty, against racism, against all kinds of social ills. Then I knew I had to have one. "

Gordon Parks was the youngest of fifteen children in a poor family in Fort Scott, Kansas. Born in 1912, he held various jobs until he could buy in 1937 in a pawnshop in Seattle, a camera, and was hired for fashion images in a mall in Minneapolis. It was clear her talent, and in 1942 received from the Farm Security Administration a grant that, among others, had obtained before Dorothea Lange. (Translated from Spanish)

Gordon Parks Featured in Art Daily

Gordon Parks Featured in Art Daily

Solo exhibition of over sixty works by Gordon Parks on view at Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco presents Gordon Parks: Higher Ground, a solo exhibition of over sixty works by one of the most important photojournalists of the 20th century. The gallery’s second solo exhibition for Parks, February 4 through April 2, 2016, commemorates his photo essays on the Civil Rights Movement.

Gordon Parks (1912 - 2006) was the first black photojournalist to work at Life magazine, from 1948 to 1972. Through Life, Parks documented the stories of those he photographed, personalizing his assignments to tell the broader story of the African American experience. By gaining their trust unlike any other photojournalist, Parks’ empathy and charisma enabled him to gain access into his subject’s world. The show will include works from the essays for Life magazine, Invisible Man, 1952; Segregation Story, 1956; Duke Ellington, 1960 The March on Washington, 1963; The Nation of Islam, 1963; Muhammad Ali, 1970; and The Black Panthers, 1970.

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Wins Rema Hort Mann Foundation 2016 Emerging Artist Grant

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Wins Rema Hort Mann Foundation 2016 Emerging Artist Grant

Announcing the 2016 Emerging Artist Grantees in Los Angles

Rema Hort Mann Foundation (RHMF) is thrilled to announce the recipients of the 2016 Emerging Artist Grant in Los Angeles. Each grantee receives a $10,000 unrestricted grant for demonstrating critical and rigorous work as well as an ability and commitment to making substantial contributions in the arts.

Gordon Parks Featured in L'oeil de la Photographie's Photo of the Day

Gordon Parks Featured in L'oeil de la Photographie's Photo of the Day

Opening of Higher Ground by Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks Featured in Juxtapoz Magazine

Gordon Parks Featured in Juxtapoz Magazine

"Gordon Parks: Higher Ground" @ Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Jenkins Johnson Gallery in San Francisco is pleased to present Gordon Parks: Higher Ground, a solo exhibition of over sixty works by one of the most important photojournalists of the 20th century.

Gordon Parks Featured in Feature Shoot

Gordon Parks Featured in Feature Shoot

Gordon Parks, The Civil Rights Movement, And The Pictures That Changed The World

The words “Lord, plant my feet on higher ground” rang out from the churches of Alabama, as black Americans opened their hymnals to sing. The year was 1956, and in Montgomery a woman by the name of Rosa Parks had just refused to surrender her bus seat to a white passenger. Nearby in Mobile, photojournalist Gordon Parks, formerly of the Farm Security Administration, told the story of the Thornton family for Life magazine, where the American public at last were given a glimpse into the daily lives, joy, and suffering of African American men, women, and children living in the Jim Crow South.

 

Gordon Parks Featured in CBS SF Bay Area News

Gordon Parks Featured in CBS SF Bay Area News

5 Ways To Celebrate Black History Month In The Bay Area

Gordon Parks Higher Ground at the Jenkins Johnson Gallery in San Francisco, February 4 – April 2

Explore the works of Gordon Parks, the man considered to be the most important black photographer  of the 20th century. The exhibit at the Jenkins Johnson Gallerysurveys works spanning nearly half a century — The Black Panthers, the favelasof Brazil, fashion models and stars.

Carlos Javier Ortiz Featured in The New Yorker

Carlos Javier Ortiz Featured in The New Yorker

“A Thousand Midnights”: Chicago and the Legacy of the Great Migration

When I was growing up, my mother, Bette Parks Sacks, often told me stories about her youth in Mississippi. She spoke in a slow, sweet drawl, despite the fact that she’d spent her entire adult life in Chicago. I knew of the hardships and beauty of the South, transmitted to me through vivid recollections of her childhood and adolescence. I knew of her deep connection to the land, a holdover from a less-than-idyllic time when she picked cotton from sunup to sundown, beginning at the age of six. I knew that when she and her father headed to Chicago, in the nineteen-fifties, the day after she graduated from high school, they’d left everything behind, including almost all existing photographs of their large family. At the time, I didn’t realize that these intensely personal stories were part of a much larger historical narrative, one that was shared by millions of other black people who went on the same journey.

Timotheus Tomicek Featred in Art Das Kunstmagazin

Timotheus Tomicek Featred in Art Das Kunstmagazin

Great sunset Kitsch

They still exist: Artists work reflects the spirit of Romanticism, aimed at outspoken universal poetry. The photo book "Hit or miss" Timotheus Tomicek for example.

What is inside?

To be exact: pictures, illustrations, sculptures, text fragments, sometimes quotes or just a sentence or a word. 112 pages, there were 84 pictures. But what exactly is to see? The pattern of a carpet, a pretzel, a black cat, a swing, a white, somewhat perplexed-eyed donkey, a candle, which is reminiscent of Gerhard Richter, a water strider, a swing with the inscription "Realité" Sunset kitsch, a red curtain, a flying carpet, fruit flies on a piece of pear ...

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in Art Ltd. Magazine

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in Art Ltd. Magazine

Alison Saar: “Bearing” - Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle "Who Among Us…" at the Museum of the African Diaspora

To illuminate the problem with exoticizing women of color, it is sometimes necessary to employ visual art as a vehicle for under- standing issues that are too provocative to talk about. Full disclosure, I am a white woman. For this reason, I walk in a casing that allows for the privilege of not being “exoticized” as a person of color. Although, as a woman I am not without the burden of being objectified, I cannot overlook the history that separates my privilege from the history inscribed on  a black woman’s body. To that end, when women talk about their bodies, the under recognized power of the Other lingers, demanding to be heard. For their concurrent solo exhibitions at the Museum of the African Diaspora, Los Angeles based artists Alison Saar and Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle focus on the African American, and African, woman’s body as a carrier of profound stories to create narratives that provoke awareness and revere both the beautiful and ugly sides of history.

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in SF Arts Monthly

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in SF Arts Monthly

Museum Highlights The Art of Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle

Los Angeles-based Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle’s first solo exhibition in San Francisco features samplings from three concurrent bodies of work and includes mixed-media works on paper and wood panel, alongside a series of artifacts and objects. Hinkle’s largely figurative images combine photographic imagery with hand-drawn and painted details to create fantastical female figures of wonder.

Melanie Pullen Featured in SF Arts Montly

Melanie Pullen Featured in SF Arts Montly

Gallery Highlights MELANIE PULLEN: SODA POP!

Los Angeles- based photographer Melanie Pullen presents an expanded series of portraits featuring men she's met on the street- "lost boys" -holding vintage soda bottles. The lighting is dramatic and evocative of late night haunts, abandoned transit stations and darkened alleys. Simultaneously mesmerizing and bizarre, the images speak to a complicated narrative we'll never know. 

Roy DeCarava Featured in Financial Times

Roy DeCarava Featured in Financial Times

Art Basel Miami Beach's 'Survey': blasts from the past

November 27,2015

It’s back to the future at Art Basel Miami Beach, which presents for the second time a selection of art historical projects, courtesy of 14 galleries, in the Survey section. The fact that contemporary art did not emerge from a vacuum is reflected in the sector, whose focus is on works made pre-2000 (curators and dealers have welcomed the historical backdrop, which gives the Florida fair gravitas).

Roy DeCarava Featured in Photograph Magazine

Roy DeCarava Featured in Photograph Magazine

THE ART FAIRS By Jordan G. Teicher

November 25, 2015

In November and December, the photography world sets up camp in Paris and Miami for a series of fairs attracting top galleries from around the globe.

In Miami, no fair is bigger than Art Basel Miami Beach, which returns to the Miami Beach Convention Center December 3-6 with 267 galleries from 32 countries. Noah Horowitz, who previously served as executive director of New York’s Armory Show, will oversee the fair for the first time. Be sure to swing by first-time exhibitor Jenkins Johnson Gallery, which will be showing Roy DeCarava’s photographs of jazz legends and everyday New York scenes from the 1940s through the 1970s.

Roy DeCarava Featured in Art Daily

Roy DeCarava Featured in Art Daily

Survey: Fourteen historical projects in focus at Art Basel's show in Miami Beach in December

November 20, 2015

Following its successful debut last year, Survey will return with 14 exhibitions of work made before 2000 brought by leading galleries from Brazil, China, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. The sector will include works by Charles Burchfield, Peter Campus, Gianni Colombo, Roy DeCarava, Rosalyn Drexler, Dorothy Iannone, Wang Jinsong, Heinz Mack, Roberto Burle Marx, Shinjiro Okamoto, Miguel Ángel Rojas, Peter Saul, Keith Sonnier and Ettore Spalletti. The 14th edition of Art Basel's Miami Beach show, whose Lead Partner is UBS, will take place at the Miami Beach Convention Center from December 3 to December 6, 2015. 
 

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in Art Forum

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in Art Forum

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle By Monica Westin

November 19, 2015

I AM USING MY FIRST MONTHS IN NIGERIA to learn more about navigating Lagos, to cook Nigerian foods, and to learn the local mythologies. Over these past weeks I have met a few students who are excited about the Kentifrica Project and the potential for empowerment and the creative leadership that it brings. I have also been working closely with my host, Dr. Adepeju Layiwola—an artist, scholar, activist, and professor at the University of Lagos. I am learning so much about the effects of colonialism on Nigerian history and culture, specifically in relationship to Benin and royal court art that was taken from the royal palace in 1897 by the British. The clash between cultural ideas concerning what is considered art, and what has ritual and ancestral importance in relationship to power, display, and economic gain is astounding and informing my work immensely. I am also making connections between how I was raised in Kentucky and the foods in the American South that are influenced by the food I am eating here. The connections are so rich! Louisville is in Lagos, and vice versa.

Melanie Pullen Featured in Autre

Melanie Pullen Featured in Autre

MELANIE PULLEN "SODA POP!" @ JENKINS JOHNSON GALLERY IN SAN FRANCISCO

November 12, 2015

Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco presents its first solo show by Los Angeles photographer Melanie Pullen. The exhibition features photographs from Soda POP!, her new series that plays with cultural assumptions; she combines things typically associated with childhood, such as computer games, and places them in adult nighttime settings. The unease is heightened featuring young people marginalized by society, neglected street kids, or male prostitutes.

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in KQED

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in KQED

Imagined Worlds at MoAD, Alphabets and Artifacts Included

November 12, 2015

After “re-imagining” their galleries, the Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) reopened yesterday with three solo exhibitions, featuring artists Tim Roseborough, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle and Alison Saar. On a material basis, the trio’s work couldn’t be more different — from digital prints to rough-hewn figurative sculpture — but connective themes between the shows enrich each in turn, bridging generations, conceptual approaches and subject matter.

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in SF Gate

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in SF Gate

Hinkle reclaims images of colonial-era Africans

November 10, 2015

“I see you — anew,” Los Angeles artist Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle seems to say to the West Africans in photographs from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which she alters, reimagines and reclaims with paint and India ink in her “The Uninvited” series.

Those works — along with pieces from “The Kentifrica Project” and “TheTituba Series” — are now on exhibit in “Who Among Us … The Art of Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle” at the Museum of the African Diaspora.

Melanie Pullen Featured in 1814 Magazine

Melanie Pullen Featured in 1814 Magazine

Interview with Melanie Pullen

October 20, 2015

Issue no 9

1814: Your latest series Soda POP!. Can you tell us a bit about that?
MP: Soda POP! is a tribute to a cross dresser that I became friends with in Greenwich Village in 1983 when I was eight years old. I couldn’t sleep so I would have to sit awake in my room until all hours of the night and my window was level with the street, one block off Christopher Street next to the old pier on the Hudson. So this six-foot seven black man would show up outside my window every night at midnight and would change his clothes in front of me, put on a blonde wig and wait for tricks… he didn’t wear underwear by the way. While he was waiting we’d talk and we became friends.

Julia Fullerton-Batten Featured in Huff Post Arts & Culture

Julia Fullerton-Batten Featured in Huff Post Arts & Culture

Photographer Brings Unbelievable Stories Of Feral Children To Life

September 30, 2015

In 1845, so the legend goes, an unclothed girl was spotted running on all fours through the wilderness near Del Rio, Texas, appearing barely human. Joined by a pack of wolves, the young girl allegedly attacked a herd of goats. The tale, though often ridiculed, spread like wildfire, and before long a group of Mexican vaqueros teamed up to hunt for the mythical Lobo Wolf Girl. 

On the third day of searching, the group supposedly captured the young girl by Espantosa Lake, surrounded by wolves. She was captured but soon escaped, tearing planks off a boarded-up window and escaping without a trace into the night. In 1852, she was said to be spotted for the final time, suckling two wolf cubs. After that, she was never seen or heard from again. 

Stories like this, hovering in an area closer to fiction than truth, reappear throughout history, popping up in different spots around the globe for centuries. Every story is unique yet familiar -- a child, lost or neglected, takes up in the wild with the creatures residing there, adapting to their characteristics and modes of survival, slowly melting into their species. Instances of such feral children have been reported from 1845 to 2008, in habitats ranging from Cambodia to Russia to the United States.

Timotheus Tomicek Featred in AnOther

Timotheus Tomicek Featred in AnOther

The Ten Photographs You Should Buy at the Unseen Photo Fair

September 16, 2015

Timotheus Tomicek, World, 2013
Cloud shots taken from airplane windows are a dime a dozen for the Instagram generation, so it's refreshing and enchanting in equal parts to see a photographer take our own self-publicising imagery to a new and distinctly more philosophical place. Timotheus Tomicekis fascinated by the limbo presented by air travel – a strange kind of semi-presence which exists far above earth and yet utterly apart from it – and with the word “WORLD” scrawled haphazardly in eyeliner on an airline window, this separation is simultaneously reinforced and diminished.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle At The Museum of Art, University of New Hampshire

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle At The Museum of Art, University of New Hampshire

Looking Where it Ain’t

September 2- October 18, 2015

Artist Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle manipulates language, images, and myths to create a personal narrative presented in three bodies of work: The Kentifrica Project, THE UNIVITED SERIES, and drawings based on I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. Hinkle’s interdisciplinary artistic practice invites participation to explore issues of identity, culture, and geography.

Annie Kevans At The Grand Palais, Paris

Annie Kevans At The Grand Palais, Paris

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier Grand Palais, Paris

April 1 - August 3, 2015

British artist Annie Kevans has been commissioned by exhibition curator Thierry-Maxime Loriot to create a series of works for the exhibition La Planète Mode de Jean Paul Gaultier.  The exhibition originated at the Barbican Gallery in London and is currently at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne. The show has received critical acclaim, and opens at the famous Grande Palais on April 1

Lalla Essaydi At The San Diego Museum of Art

Lalla Essaydi At The San Diego Museum of Art

Lalla Essaydi: Photographs

March 28 - August 4, 2015

Moroccan-born, New York-based photographer Lalla Essaydi (b. 1956) explores issues surrounding the role of women in Arab culture and their representation in the western European artistic tradition. Her large-scale photographs are based on nineteenth-century Orientalist paintings, but work to subvert those stereotyped and sexualized representations. Aside from their timely and provocative subject matter, Essaydi’s photographs are technically impressive. Behind each of her images is weeks of preparation, as the text is composed, the fabrics are dyed to match the setting in which they will appear, and the architectural backdrops are carefully constructed. The entire field of the almost life-size photographs appears in sharp focus, the result of her use of a large-format camera and traditional film.

Lalla Essaydi at the San Diego Museum of Art

Lalla Essaydi at the San Diego Museum of Art

Lalla Essaydi Photographs

March 28, 2015

Moroccan-born, New York-based photographer Lalla Essaydi (b. 1956) explores issues surrounding the role of women in Arab culture and their representation in the western European artistic tradition. Her large-scale photographs are based on nineteenth-century Orientalist paintings, but work to subvert those stereotyped and sexualized representations. Aside from their timely and provocative subject matter, Essaydi’s photographs are technically impressive. Behind each of her images is weeks of preparation, as the text is composed, the fabrics are dyed to match the setting in which they will appear, and the architectural backdrops are carefully constructed. The entire field of the almost life-size photographs appears in sharp focus, the result of her use of a large-format camera and traditional film.

Lalla Essaydi Featured in KPBS

Lalla Essaydi Featured in KPBS

San Diego Museum Of Art Exhibition Explores Issues Surrounding Role Of Women In Arab Culture

March 26, 2015

Moroccan-born photographer Lalla Essaydi is bringing her work to San Diego in a new exhibition at the San Diego Museum of Art.

The exhibition features 10 large-scale contemporary photographs of women from three different series by the artist, based on 19th century Orientalist paintings. (Orientalist painting is a term used by art historians for 19th century art depicting the Middle East.)

Lalla Essaydi At I.D.E.A. Space, Colorado College

Lalla Essaydi At I.D.E.A. Space, Colorado College

ReOrientations: Defining and Defying 19th-Century French Images of the Arab World

March 25 - May 7, 2015

“ReOrientations” examines the historical genesis and contemporary manifestations of Orientalism — a concept that places the East (the Middle East and Asia) in opposition to the European West. Orientalist images often characterize the “Orient” as exotic, violent, or hypersexualized. “ReOrientations” examines the legacy of Orientalism through a consideration of historical and contemporary artworks.  The exhibition features 19th-century French Orientalist paintings and works on paper from the collection of the Dahesh Museum, placed alongside photographs by contemporary artists Lalla Essaydi and Ibi Ibrahim.

Lalla Essaydi Featured Colorado Springs Independent

Lalla Essaydi Featured Colorado Springs Independent

ReOrient yourself, Identifying the Middle East at the I.D.E.A. Space, in its own terms

March 25, 2015

Let's be honest, the Middle East has gotten a bad rap. With an expanding amount of media attention drawn to violent acts by violent groups, it's no wonder the identity of this region of 20-some nations remains as elusive, distorted and inaccessible to the western world as ever. This week, however, Colorado College's new I.D.E.A. Space exhibit opens the proverbial iron curtain with ReOrientations: Defining and Defying 19th Century French Images of the Arab World.

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in The Architecture of Tomorrow

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle Featured in The Architecture of Tomorrow

Armory Week of Art Fairs—Smartest Art I Found

March 13, 2015

I am sure there was the coolest smart art that I missed out on, these are works that were most visceral initially or came by frequency in tune with my radar and frequency. Beginning with Spring Break, moving on to Volta, a quick tour of the Armory Show, and Pulse. Spring Break was a break from the frowns and furs of the Armory, but really it wasn’t a break—I was there for hours upon hours. 

Nathaniel Donnett Featured in Huff Post Black Voices

Nathaniel Donnett Featured in Huff Post Black Voices

On the "A" w/Souleo: New PBS Doc Examines How One School is Beating The Odds

March 12, 2015

You've probably written on paper, crumbled it up, and even cut it. But have you ever used it to create a giant installation of puppets? Such was the showpiece greeting attendees at the latest fair to take part in Armory Arts Week, Art on Paper. Unlike most other fairs during the busy New York City art season, Art on Paper sticks to a unifying theme of works using and inspired by, you guessed it--paper. 
 

Melanie Pullen Featured in Hyperallergic

Melanie Pullen Featured in Hyperallergic

Art on Paper Joins the Armory Week Fold

March 6, 2015

Despite Art on Paper’s name, the work at the first-time Armory Week fair includes as many different materials as at any other fair, with art created on paper and art inspired by paper on view.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle At VOLTA NY

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle At VOLTA NY

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, Solo Show, At VOLTA NY

March 5 - 8, 2015

Kenyatta A.C Hinkle is an interdisciplinary visual artist, writer, and performer who integrates cultural criticism, personal narrative, social practice, and historical research to interrogate structures of power concerning race and representation. Hinkle questions how these structures influence ideas of self through drawing, painting, collage, video, and performance. Hinkle conducts extensive experimentation and play to form several bodies of work simultaneousl

Lalla Essaydi Featured in Huff Post Arts & Culture

Lalla Essaydi Featured in Huff Post Arts & Culture

The Veiled Feminism Of Moroccan-Born Photographer Lalla Essaydi

February 11, 2015

In his landmark book, Orientalism, the late scholar Edward Said wrote of "exteriority," a disconnect between the traveler's fantasies and reality. Reading the travelogues of French writers, Said once explained that he found "representations of the Orient had very little to do with what I knew about my own background in life."

The work of photographer Lalla Essaydi sits somewhere inside the gaps Said felt so keenly. Part of a new wave of Moroccan artists enjoying success under the liberalized reign of King Mohammed VI (who holds some of Essaydi's pieces in his private collection), she lives in New York City and works from her family home in Morocco, a large and elaborate house dating back to the 16th century. The portraits she shoots inside -- always of women -- recall 19th century French depictions of Arab concubines, popularly known as odalisques.

Carol Prusa at The American Academy of Arts and Letters

Carol Prusa at The American Academy of Arts and Letters

THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND LETTERS ANNOUNCES 2015 INVITATIONAL EXHIBITION OF VISUAL ARTS MARCH 12 - APRIL 12

January 29, 2015

Paintings, sculptures, photographs, and works on paper by 40 contemporary artists will be exhibited at the galleries of the American Academy of Arts and Letters on historic Audubon Terrace (Broadway between 155 and 156 Streets) from Thursday, March 12 through Sunday, April 12, 2015. Exhibiting artists were chosen from a pool of over 200 nominees submitted by the members of the Academy, America’s most prestigious honorary society of architects, artists, writers, and composers.

Lalla Essaydi At The Cantor Arts Center

Lalla Essaydi At The Cantor Arts Center

She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

January 28–May 4, 2015

A major new exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center, She Who Tells a Story, presents the pioneering work of 12 leading women photographers from Iran and the Arab world. The artists explore identity, narrative, representation, and war in daily life, inviting a broader understanding of the Middle East than what Westerners glean through media reports. The 79 photographs and two videos—a collection of stories about contemporary life—especially refute the belief that women from this region are oppressed and powerless. The exhibition was organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA) and runs at the Cantor, its only West-Coast venue, January 28 through May 4.

The 81 works, created almost entirely within the last decade, range in style from fine art to photojournalism and represent the women’s diverse perspectives. The photographers are: Jananne Al-Ani, Boushra Almutawakel, Gohar Dashti, Rana El Nemr, Lalla Essaydi, Shadi Ghadirian, Tanya Habjouqa, Rula Halawani, Nermine Hammam, Rania Matar, Shirin Neshat, and Newsha Tavakolian. In Arabic, the word rawiya means "she who tells a story," and through their work, these 12 pioneering artists collectively portray a region that has undergone unparalleled change and endured continuing conflict.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle At Allegheny College, Pittsburgh, PA

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle At Allegheny College, Pittsburgh, PA

Performing Blackness :: Performing Whiteness

January 20 - March 3, 2015

This exhibition examines constructions of racial identity to complicate popular rhetoric around race. The artworks interrogate oversimplifying binaries and destabilize the often unexamined position of “whiteness.” The artists deploy visual texts in the service of asking uncomfortable questions, reflecting upon identity, and asking the viewer to consider his/her own role in building, enabling, or perpetuating stereotypes. Invited artists are Sandra Brewster, Steve Cole, Andrea Chung, Brendan Fernandes, Vanessa German, Kenyatta Hinkle, Ayanah Moor, James Seward, and Alisha Wormsley.

Gordon Parks At The Museum Of Fine Arts, Boston

Gordon Parks At The Museum Of Fine Arts, Boston

Gordon Parks: Back to Fort Scott

January 17 - September 13, 2015

Gordon Parks, one of the most celebrated African American artists of his time, is the subject of this exhibition of groundbreaking photographs of Fort Scott, Kansas—focusing on the realities of life under segregation during the 1940s, but also relating to Parks’s own fascinating life story. 

Gordon Parks Featured In The New York Times

Gordon Parks Featured In The New York Times

‘A Long Hungry Look’: Forgotten Gordon Parks Photos Document Segregation

December 24, 2014

In 1950, Gordon Parks was the only African-American photographer working for Life magazine, a rising star who was gaining the power to call his own shots, and he proposed a cover story both highly political and deeply personal: to return to Fort Scott, Kan., the prairie town where he had grown up, to find his 11 classmates in a segregated middle school. 

Scott Fraser Featured in Western Art and Architechture

Scott Fraser Featured in Western Art and Architechture

Still Life As Story

December 2014

heated debates never end about what’s “in” in the art world and what isn’t. One year the buzz is that Realism is coming back or fading away, that Abstraction is where the action is, or Pop art or color fields or drips and cubes, on and on. Yet over centuries it has proven to be excellence, inspiration and extraordinary passion that make art memorable, regardless of artificial categories. All important aspects being equal — craftsmanship, design, color theory — what is truly fresh and lasting is the innovation that accompanies the skills. In today’s expanding galaxy of New Realism, few American painters light up the sky as does still-life master Scott Fraser.

Patricia Piccinini At The Newcastle Art Gallery, Australia

Patricia Piccinini At The Newcastle Art Gallery, Australia

Like Us

November 29, 2014 - February 22, 2015

Like Us is an substantial exhibition that highlights the key themes of my practice. The work is often intense, sometimes strange, sometimes beautiful, frequently emotional, accessible yet complex and always looking to create connections with the audience and stimulate thought and discussion.

Roy DeCarava Featured in Lens Culture

Roy DeCarava Featured in Lens Culture

Dark Music at Paris Photo: Photographs by Roy DeCarava and Daisuke Yokota

November 2014

Amongst the thousands of photographers on show at Paris Photo recently, there were two very dark highlights: a set of shadowy photogravures by American photographer Roy DeCarava, made in 1991 from mid-20th century negatives; and a new but equally black photobook by young Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota. 

Aside from being dark and monochrome, these two sets of pictures initially seemed to have little in common. The former is classic and figurative, the latter more experimental and abstract. But closer inspection revealed a shared inspiration between these unlike series: music. 

Scott Fraser Featured In Behind the Easel

Scott Fraser Featured In Behind the Easel

Behind the Easel: The Unique Voices of 20 Contemporary Representational Painters

November 5, 2014

Most art books are not in the first person, so while there is some truth to the analyses, some things are always off. Robert C Jackson set out to interview 20 contemporary representational artists (himself included) and showcase their artwork within the context of their interviews. Here you will meet Steven Assael, Bo Bartlett, Debra Bermingham, Margaret Bowland, Paul Fenniak, Scott Fraser, Woody Gwyn, F Scott Hess, Laurie Hogin, Robert C Jackson, Alan Magee, Janet Monafo, John Moore, Charles Pfahl, Scott Prior, Stone Roberts, Sandra Mendelsohn Rubin, Daniel Sprick, Will Wilson, and Jerome Witkin. Each of these artists has a very elusive quality -- a unique voice. Seeing their work from across a room they are all recognisable. Their artworks are showcased in this large book with over 140 illustrations of their paintings as well as photographs of the artists in their studios and an epilogue by Pamela Sienna.

Lavar Munroe Residency at Nirox Foundation: South Africa

Lavar Munroe Residency at Nirox Foundation: South Africa

South Africa’s traumatic social history, its remarkable transformation and its diversity of culture and landscape, is a crucible for creative engagement. NIROX offers residency to international and local artists, providing insight and access to the region’s extraordinary cultural and environmental heritage. Conversely, artists bring their spotlight into the region. The program has no predilection for style or dogma, emphasizing work that is relevant, challenging and uplifting.

Lavar Munroe Residency at Flying Horse Editions

Lavar Munroe Residency at Flying Horse Editions

Visiting Artist & Master Printer Program

In 2014 FHE established a Visiting Artist & Master Printer program with the goal of creating a world-class program that promotes creative interaction between professional artists and students while also creating sustainability within the printmaking field—by training the next generation of artists and printmakers.